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TO MANY DOORS IN THE DINING ROOM
smekicdelic
November 5, 2012 in Design Dilemma
How can I hide doors or make them less obvious. I do not want my dinning room to look like a door-way or an enterence-room.
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creeser
Could you post a photo? It would help to see the layout of the room.
November 5, 2012 at 3:31AM     
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charleee
A couple of ideas would be to make sure your doors are flat panel doors, and then you could remove any trim around them to make the wall flat. But creeser is right, it would be very helpful to have a picture.
November 5, 2012 at 5:09AM     
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PRO
Dytecture
Photos or floor plan of the dining room would be helpful. Also if possible try to reconfigure the circulation of the house so the dining room doesn't become a pass-thru space.
November 5, 2012 at 6:05AM   
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chapstick049
You could paint the doors/trim the same colour as the wall. They will still be noticeable, but not as much as having a white door and trim with a darker colour wall (obviously this may or may not work depending on the colours and layout of the room)
November 5, 2012 at 6:13AM   
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smekicdelic
Unfortunatlly, it is very old house and we have no chance to invest much... only painting maybe. I see now that grey is dark. The walls are too uneven for white.
November 6, 2012 at 3:29AM   
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charleee
Ok, well, I will say that the doors being white against the gray wall don't bother me at all. What does bother me is that there is so much "stuff" and so many picutres that the room looks smaller than it is, a bit over crowded and there's no place for the eye to rest.

I would suggest you pare down by at least 50%. Start by removing all the pics on the walls next to the doors, then move on to the sideboard and the books above. I really think that once you do this you will enjoy your room much better.
November 6, 2012 at 3:40AM     
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creeser
I really like the shelf above the door, but would paint it white like the doors and trim and make it more decorative. I agree with BobbiP in that if you took out a lot of the 'stuff' in the room, it would be more restful. Start by moving everything out except your table and chairs and add one piece ... photos included... at a time until it feels 'enough".
[houzz=
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November 6, 2012 at 3:48AM     
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smekicdelic
White is so relaxing. Maybe I should paint it light. There is many pictures here on your photo too, but they don˙t make such a mass like in my room.
November 6, 2012 at 4:06AM   
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creeser
I think you have a lovely color in your room, but if you like lighter colors, it may help the doors to blend in more as in the photo above. If you wanted to pain the hutch and the table to the far left a white as well, then they would fade into the walls more as does the chair above.
November 6, 2012 at 5:12AM   
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winterriver
Are all of the doors necessary? If they go to other public spaces, consider removing them.
November 6, 2012 at 8:11AM   
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PRO
Linda
My kitchen is the room of many doors here. I have a stand open door which is almost permanently open to the dining room side. I had to keep the door to the back hallway since ithat area isn't heated. We also had a door to the center hall which we took off about a year after we moved in (20 years ago...) we put that door in the attic and haven't missed it yet! If the next owners want to put it back on, they can do so. I agree with the remove door if possible idea
November 6, 2012 at 9:00AM   
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nevadan
This is a really easy problem to deal with. Paint the doors to match the walls, and also remove the art work. The art work tend to emphasize the doors. In addition, if any of the doors is non-functional, remove the door and just leave a doorway. Usually a doorway as opposed to a door is adequate unless you are dealing with a bedroom, a bathroom, or a closet.
November 6, 2012 at 9:07AM     
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smekicdelic
Doors lead to the bathroom, the bedroom and the children`s room. I think you are all right: I have to paint the walls and the doors in the same shade.. maybe lighter grey because this dark shade absorves too much light. I should also change chair covers in lighter shade. I am not very comfortable with removing the pictures... I am an artist and I like to exhibit my drawings and this is the the room visitors first see.... This is only part of the living room.. I admitt it is very crowded with paintings. That is why I painted the walls grey, to somehow unify the room crowded with so many colours and shapes.
November 6, 2012 at 11:32PM   
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smekicdelic
I am even afraid to show how massy is my living room... I do not have a studio.. Two sons have their rooms and also husband having a recording studio in the basement. I am stick to the living room/kitchen:(.
November 6, 2012 at 11:35PM   
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victorianbungalowranch
I like all the pictures and the grey too (the dining room could be lighter than the living room, or maybe a wall), but the difference in the mats and framing in the dining room is throwing me off a bit. Love the little hutch as it is--maybe the blue paintings in the living room can move over and pick up that color and texture. Too bad Mr. Chicken is too big--it picks up the red in the kitchen nicely. Maybe another shelf in the living room will give you more room for display.

At least you are still creating. I haven't done much in a long time, in part because of the mess and no place to put it all. Already have a large closet stuffed with my art and photography, and the art I inherited from my Mom. plus stuff from friends and I just liked. Every once in a while I shuffle through it and rearrange what's on the walls, but not as much as I should.

Anyway, I think it is bright and fun. Perhaps red cushions on the dining chairs would help unite it all.
November 7, 2012 at 12:40AM     
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smekicdelic
I just painted the cupboards in light turqois shades... it helped lightening the room... I must change the chaier covrs.. red would be nice, I agree..
November 7, 2012 at 2:08AM   
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victorianbungalowranch
Like the lighter color. Do you think Mr Chicken would fit on the bamboo blind? I used to have something similar on my wall and used small binder clips (the black and wire kind to hold stacks of paper together) to hang the art on top--worked great, I just clipped it in the corners and poked the prongs through to the back and fliped open. Small ones are best, if the work is on paper or canvas and is not too heavy. You can wrap a bit of paper around the clip to protect the art.

Maybe the beady-eye stare isn't for everyone. Some of those landscapes might be nice, but look too heavy to hang there unless you suspended them with eye hooks and chains or something. Still he is so big and graphic, I think he would be fun, and it brings the red into the room to relate to the kitchen. Maybe another red piece of art would be enough to jazz things up without investing in new chair covers. I think sometimes more color works to unite a space rather than less.

And it would free up some space in the living room for new art. And maybe a new long narrow custom piece of art (with some red in it?) can replace the black ones on the wall in the dining room, perhaps coupled with the mirror. The open door sure helps a lot too.

In the Living Room, I would consider putting maybe grouping the little portraits in another location--are they self-portraits? I think they distract from the big ones over the TV--or replace one of the big ones with a tight grouping of the4 littles, including the one on the side of the TV. The big ones are both lovely, but so similar that I think they take away from each other, and bit more variety would be nice.
______

I guess decorator/born organized types don't understand us artists who have to have a lot of visual stimulation and are inspired by the stuff we make and pick up. .:) It is especially hard in cramped spaces. The spare or very edited look is lovely, but doesn't fit my magpie instincts and diverse interests, although I admit reducing the amount of stuff and putting like with like can make what is left look better, even if it is in a rather full room. And less stuff means less housework, but it is so hard to pick amohg favorites!

I found these pictures and quotes from http://adornmentboutique.com/design-dilemma-lending-the-artists-touch-to-your-home/. Perhaps you can relate to some of these thoughts:

"Artist’s homes have a special quality. Creativity reigns through riotous color, unexpected juxtapositions and an “anything goes” feel that speaks of creative freedom and the willingness to take chances. The look of an artist’s home is often very different from the look of the home of a professional decorator or an architect. Decorators follow trends. They adhere to strict design rules. Architects also have their rules and usually seek purity of form. Artists, on the other hand, don’t like rules. They can take what might feel like clutter or chaos in other contexts and turn it into art.

So what makes an artist’s home artsy?
■ Artists aren’t afraid of color. They use it in both large and small doses where many of us would normally fear to tread. They also aren’t afraid to use vibrant walls, floor colorings, and vibrant paintings that are rotated quite often.
■ Artists aren’t afraid to be offbeat. A home need not look like a magazine spread to please an artist. In fact, artists are often looking for something distinctive and different that will set their home apart from the homes of the masses. In other words “tasteful” is not usually the goal.
■Always short on money, artists reinvent, repurpose and reuse. You’ll find ballot boxes turned into furniture, wine bottles turned into light fixtures, and many other inventive new uses for objects in artists’ homes.
■Art takes center stage, informing design choices. Artists often use their homes as a gallery space for their own art. Their art informs which furniture they choose.
■Artists’ homes are relaxed. Artist usually don’t have the money or patience for “uptight” spaces. So artists homes, as a result, are often relaxed in feeling, the kind of space where friends can gather for an impromptu salon session. Warm, welcoming and always changing, the home is a blank canvas where no real mistakes are possible."
November 7, 2012 at 10:27AM     
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smekicdelic
Thanks! This is so true. My space really is my private gallery and also is place for gathering friends to party every weekendAnd.. and I do not like it to be too clean like from magazine and I am short on money and I like colour in spite of the fact it is only an illusion.... I will try to put the rooster in the dining area. The red fits here. I am waiting my paintings from the eshibition to come next weekend and then I will try to make them fit into space. They are all on canvases and they have no frames and only the colour will decide where it would go. Also, photographing the room helped a lot to see it how it really looks and how crowded is the space. The problem of using the room for many purposes - dining, living, entertaining and as a studio.. it is what makes it difficult the most. But you helped a lot. On the other side of the room there are even bigger problems like uneven hights of windows and doors and the mess in my studio-space.. I know the panelling would help.. but it will wait better times. I tried with the bamboo and different drapes... to hide the part of the problem. Thank you very much for trying to help.
November 7, 2012 at 11:32PM   
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victorianbungalowranch
I hope the designers out there aren't offended--I think they are artists too, just in a different way, and probably quite a few are both.

I think what you have works pretty well with the heights. And the studio space isn't so bad. Maybe a more narrow shelf or sofa table next to the wall by the window perhaps so you can scooch the easel over and maybe bring the armoire out a bit so you can store stuff behind it. Gosh, maybe even a built in cabinet up high all across the windows and doors could be a hiding place for excess artwork.

It looks European to me--do you live in Germany or England by any chance? You could get one of those apothecary chests with all the little drawers and stash a lot of your paint and supplies, and maybe color code the drawers. Or a small dresser would do--something wide enough for the palette but a bit longer to give you room for medium and brushes. Maybe the top can be hinged so you can make it bigger if you need to the space and add some casters or sliders to the legs..

I like those red curtains and accents you are putting around there. And great exterior door!. Do you have a conservatory?
November 7, 2012 at 11:57PM   
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smekicdelic
I am from Croatia... but my plan is to make long shallow cabinet beneath the window.. or closed desk... no conservatory but we could build it.. there is a big deck around the part of the apartment. The money is always the issue. This is Croatia (maybe you heard of Dubrovnik but I am not near the Adriatic Sea:( .. I live in the valley cold Vallis Aurea because of the Romans - there are fields of wheat:).. and hills surounding the city and vineyards. Maybe you would like to find me on facebook.. there are many pictures there... I am Snjezana Mekic Delic on Facebook.. and in real life :D
November 8, 2012 at 1:17AM   
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victorianbungalowranch
Oh, that sounds so lovely. I lived in Germany for a total of 12 years and miss it very much. Space and money and time are limitations for most of us. I don't belong to Facebook, but now I'm addicted to Houzz because it is a place I can share my knowlege of art and historic architecture. I live in a small US town and there isn't much of a forum here for that, or much money to do anything.
November 8, 2012 at 3:37AM     
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victorianbungalowranch
Checked out your pages and your MySpace page. I can't believe you are self-taught--your art is so sophisticated and the colors are great. I hope you are in a better place than you were a year ago. i think you could maybe market glicee (sp? High quality digital prints) reproductions of your work, especially the chickens with attitude series and some of the portraits. Really like the Modiglioni inspired work--he is my Dad's favorite artist--and you managed to do it without being obvious and with personality. I don't know anything about getting your stuff to the US market, but I do think there are possibilities. There is a lady on here who represents artists, so that may be a place to start.
November 8, 2012 at 9:40PM   
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smekicdelic
Thanks, Victoria:)... well, I am on Fineartamerica but nothing happens, http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/snjezana-mekic-delic.html
November 8, 2012 at 10:16PM   
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