powered by
Discussions
Photos
Products
Ideabooks
Discussions
Professionals
Users
My husband recently bought this house, it was not my 1st choice. I need help, it has NO street appeal
hlk226
November 13, 2012 in Design Dilemma
The original owners of this house built it with the idea of an old school house in mind. It has some good qualities like being all brick. I struggle with the curb appeal. Would window boxes and shutters be enough to help this?
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
TJP Designs and Construction LLC
Shutters and a color on the front door would go a long way. some corner brackets on the front posts may help too!
November 13, 2012 at 6:53am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Barn Light Electric Company
I think painting the door or trim a bold color would help the house stand out more. Are those sconces on both sides of the door? Adding vibrant sconces that would contrast with the brick would add interest to the entry way.

These sconces come in some great colors and are made with long lasting porcelain enamel so you don't have to worry that they will ever rust.
http://www.barnlightelectric.com/porcelain-lights-goosenecks-pendants/wheeler-wall-sconces/
November 13, 2012 at 7:56am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
pcmom1
Definitely paint the door. If it is within budget, takie down the small railings and widen the steps the entire width of the porch (or at least the width of your walkway).
November 13, 2012 at 8:06am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
victorianbungalowranch
Shutters on top and window boxes on bottom would help quite a bit. I'm of mixed minds if the window above the porch should have shutters or not.

Perhaps addintg to the truss to the porch gable, or close it completely with some tradional molding to edge it, fill in the space a bit. Or maybe just a large hanging lantern light fixture. If you can, thicker square corner and newel posts for the stairs would help a great deal. You could also paint the front door gray or another color. Scalloped window shades on the inside or possibly awnings on the outside would help scale down the big windows. Anyway, you would end up with something more Colonial Revival ( a style that emphasizes oversized details and sort of a mixed cottage look) if you did.

This will be expensive, but adding a porch on both sides across the front , maybe with chunky square balasters or Chippendale type railings, or even an open deck and pergola, would do quite a lot to unify the facade and make it feel a bit more inviting. Flattening the slope of the gable and doubling the pillars might help as well. Not school house like, but this house is not very schoolhousish anyway.

Some more trees and landscaping, especially by the sides would help cut down the bulk too, and merge those shapes in better..

I would ;andscape. add the shutters (and the bigger windows on the side of the main house too), and beef up the stair posts a lot to tie in better with the pillars, maybe add window boxes, and see how that works before doing anything else.

If you decide to add a porch or a raised pergola, I would seek the help of an architect to get it right.
November 13, 2012 at 8:21am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Sharyn
Was the covered porch original to the house? To me it doesn't look complete, I just see an open frame, triangle The pitch of the roof should match the house roof. Can you fill in the open section with a coordinating siding? Also paint the door and add shutters. Very pretty house.
November 13, 2012 at 8:25am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
apple_pie_order
The house is very attractive: symmetric style, great windows, inviting front porch, good walkway. It may not have been your first choice (not many of us get our first choice in houses), but its curb appeal can be improved easily. I'd go with your original ideas: shutters and window boxes. I like this company's window box site: http://www.flowerwindowboxes.com/Window-Boxes-Gallery.html

If you are in an area heading into a cold winter, try a fall wreath on the door. This is probably not the door you yourself enter most often (no garage visible). IME, the door you enter is also needs an appearance you like very much. Buy another wreath and big welcome mat for the door you use.
November 13, 2012 at 8:27am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
hlk226
Thank you so much for all of your advice! I am trying to hard to have a good perspective on this house. I will need a whole lot of help on the inside also :) Instead of wood or tile floors they used laminate planks thru out the WHOLE house. In the few spots were they did not use that they used rolled out linolium instead of tile. Once again, thank you thank you!
November 13, 2012 at 9:16am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
houssaon
I think the house is missing the mark on the gable. Look at these styles: Painted Room Exteriors Authentic Colonial Transformation
November 13, 2012 at 9:57am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
victorianbungalowranch
Well, at least laminate is very durable and if you cover it with rugs and such, it isn't so bad. And if you drop a dish on vinyl, it doesn't break at least. To replace the whole thing would be expensive, and just replacing part might look odd, depending on the layout. If you want to do a lot of work inside and out, it is good to sit down and figure out your priorities compared to how long you plan to live there and what bothers you most, and consult an architect or designer.

If you post pics and a floorplan here, folks will give you feedback on where to begin.

Perhaps you want to concentrate on function first and then style and give yourself time to plan--the result will be more successful. Meantime, a few inexpensive cosmetic touches will lift the spirits a bit.

As you notice on most of these photos paint and formal urns or pots with flowers or toparies are commonly used next to the door. That alone will make the front more inviting (if it is warm enough to paint--at least 50 degrees or higher), plus maybe a wreath on the door or over the door on the wall in the open gable. Keep the scale very large to fit the oversized scale of the house. Perhaps a pot of branches with leaves and then twinkle lights would do for now.

It might be a good idea to start by consulting a good landscape architect or even a floral designer. You just need something to add some detail and scale to the house. And although the open gable is a bit of a challenge, it maybe can be worked with to give a contemporary spin on Colonial Style, at least for now.
November 13, 2012 at 10:15am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
decoenthusiaste
It seems to me the proportion of your porch is off and the style is too contemporary. Maybe adding a curve in front, instead of that massive straight board, would be a starting place.
Architecture Walk: Exterior Styles and Palettes
Authentic Colonial Transformation
November 13, 2012 at 10:23am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
hlk226
Thank you so much!! I am starting to feel better about this home purchase. Filling in the gable above the door with a curve will dramatically change the look. It would also be somewhat cost effective in the big picture of things. I was intially thinking that this house was not going to look right until a porch across the whole front was installed. I am very comfortable with landscape and floral projects. I have lots of seasonal decor to hang on the door also. Seriously all of your ideas have brightened my day :)
November 13, 2012 at 10:33am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
hlk226
Thank you so much!! I am starting to feel better about this home purchase. Filling in the gable above the door with a curve will dramatically change the look. It would also be somewhat cost effective in the big picture of things. I was intially thinking that this house was not going to look right until a porch across the whole front was installed. I am very comfortable with landscape and floral projects. I have lots of seasonal decor to hang on the door also. Seriously all of your ideas have brightened my day :)
November 13, 2012 at 10:33am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
jennyno1
1. I'd fill in the gable - like other's advised. 2. Put "working" shutters on upper left and right windows- they should be the same size as the windows. (SW 6249 Storm Cloud) 3. Chunky moulding around upper middle window and both lower windows- add flower boxes the length of the lower windows, but only if you have a green thumb and can maintain FRESH there. Otherwise, skip the boxes. 4. Paint front door (SW 6250 Granite Peak) Good luck! Really close to be a very pretty house!
November 13, 2012 at 10:58am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
judianna20
My first home with my husband was a 1910 hip roof center entrance colonial almost exactly like yours, except mine was stucco. We loved that house and so did our neighbors! I had wood shutters on all the windows. My entry was enclosed (probably to contain the heat). Your entry is just not important enough. A good finish carpenter could trim that out and cover up that empty space above and beef up the columns. I think the front steps could be wider and eliminate those spindles allowing the railings to come down with the steps. A personal thing here, I don't like those boxwoods lining the walkway.

November 13, 2012 at 1:49pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
dcer
I vote for the lights barn light electric suggested, a bold color on the door/trim, window boxes with flowers, and beefy painted shutters. Good luck!
November 13, 2012 at 2:09pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Stellar Landscapes
Many good comments in regards tto the front porch it really needs to be enhanced to catch up to the rest of the building in regards to scale and substance, the same goes for the landscaping, it is not to scale and does not reflect or enhance the space even though it appears to be installed properly.
If you would like further assistance email. thomascavan@gmail.com or check out my website: Calipre Designs.com
November 14, 2012 at 2:48am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Amy Canary
I love painted brick. It softens the home and looks classic.
November 14, 2012 at 3:49am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
lisafranklin
I agree, Paint the brick and put "real" shutters on the top floor. Paint the door.It will look amazing
November 14, 2012 at 3:57am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Red Dot Construction
Some great ideas here. I really like the idea of an expanded porch across the front to not only add a visual but usable space that would add a lot of value. the current porch could be expanded to make more of a feature instead of the square house being the only feature. Planter beds in the front to break up the lawn and have more areas of interest. From a contractor I see lots of potential, it will be a matter of budget and how long you plan to stay in the home.
November 14, 2012 at 3:58am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
tsudhonimh
Mostly what it needs is some serious landscaping ... one tree and a skinny strip of meatball shrubs is not enough to do it justice. And a "pop of color" on the front door isn't going to make those meatballs look any better.

1 - Add a couple of small trees (pick ONE species and varieties that will have a mature size 15-20 feet) that do well in your climate, preferable flowering or fall foliage. Crepe myrtle? Fruit tree? Magnolia? Place them like this: one in line with the front corner of the porch about 10 feet away from that corner, and one in line with the corner of the house, halfway between the first tree and the sidewalk (as long as this doesn't make it within 5 feet of the walk)

Add a third, if you have room, about halfway between the corner of the house and the right front conrer of the yard.

They will NOT be lined up. They will soften the view of the house from the street and give you something pretty to look at out of the windows.

NOTE: that small tree to the right is going to cause you problems unless it's a species that remains tiny ... it's far too close to the house. Remove it now, while it's easy and cheap, and plant some trees The closest planting distance is 1/2 or more the expected mature spread. If the tree is expected to be 20 feet wide at maturity, plant it 10 or more feet from the house. Yes, it looks wimpy for a while, but trees will grow.

2 - Widen the plantings along the walkway by adding perennials and annuals and perennial ornamental grasses. Replace those meatballs with softer-looking shrubs that won't need much pruning. A good proportion for a sidewalk lining bed is 1/2 to 1 times the width of the walk.

3 - Extend the foundation plantings towards the street - on the left, merge them with the walkway plantings. And wrap them around the corners, too.
November 14, 2012 at 4:05am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
S & P Interiors
I agree with a lot of the comments, and think good window treatments will go a long way to giving this house kerb appeal.
November 14, 2012 at 5:10am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
katyellow
I think window boxes would DEFINITELY help, but only if they're somewhat maintained (see: http://bit.ly/Qd7pdY). I hate seeing window boxes full of brown stems in the summer time. I also agree with the recommendations to add shutters and paint the door. And those little railings should be replaced if money's not tight!
November 14, 2012 at 5:11am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
sheilabou
I find your house is great and will be beautiful once you add more trees and landscaping and wait a few years. My opinion is that your house screams for symmetry. Your curvy walkway does not tie into anything logical like a driveway and garage. I would do the work with the porch as suggested already, widen the steps, and have the walkway come straight out. With that done, you can plan your landscaping. Good luck.
November 14, 2012 at 5:29am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Ann Smitt
Congratulations on your new hom. Consult a local and reliable Landscape Architect regarding the outer body of the house and excisting landscape. If that's not in your budget clip virtual picts online and make a project book for your Updated Schoolhouse. Create a budget for the short and longterm. My first thought was that the plantings looked too formal. Soften them with potted plants like petunias, marigolds etc. that evoke a schoolhouse garden vibe (nothing fussy like boxwoods and roses). Have fun with this project with your family. Enjoy.
November 14, 2012 at 5:40am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
happymonk
Create full frontal porch and landscape with sweeping circular patterns. Remove cutesey boxwood lane altogether & stop your walkway at the sidewalk (unless your address is a bustop), letting the tree lawn grow back & clarifying the separation between your home & the street.
November 14, 2012 at 5:46am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
thickskin
Take the covered porch the entire length of the house, plus paint the door a very bright colour shutters would also help especially the window above the front door. Add a few trees to soften the house. The curved driveway is beautiful. Good Feng Shui..
November 14, 2012 at 6:04am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
benefield
I would paint the trim, door, and porch to begin with. Get rid of those rails widen the steps and the cheesy bushes down the walkway. Invest in larger plants closer to the house. I agree with shutters up top and planters below. Just start with what you can do now.
November 14, 2012 at 6:19am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
greenthumb2
hip roof, Yes!
before you spend a dime, what do you like? Craftsman look or colonial look or more modern look. Once you can answer this together (hopefully) then move into ideas that work for you financially.
An architect to address the pitch of the front porch if you need a total redesign. However, a great contractor can address the pitch, which btw does not match your roofline. very distracting from the basic style of your roof.
this alone may have made you queasy when you first saw it, and every time you drive up.
don't pull up all your boxwoods unless you do not intend to have gardening time. They make a pretty good delineation between areas of your landscape. If you do not like that much lawn, hire a landscape designer. do agree a landing pad at the curb is fine. no boxwoods there unless you are ok with tending to them too.
In the meantime, just get through the front door and start living. Cold weather flowers on a table in the entry will help you breathe a sigh of relief after a long day. don't rush around if you aren't on a strict timeline. by the time better weather arrives -- you will know 1) priority and 2) secondary items.
November 14, 2012 at 6:22am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
hannarm
Yes to shutters that are the correct size and dimensions. First impression is that this would be an incredibly warm and welcoming home with a porch that extends across the entire front of the house and wraps around the right side. This would be especially effective if there is a dining or family room on that side with a doorway to the porch. The porch roof should follow the hip design of the home as the existing arch looks like an afterthought.
November 14, 2012 at 6:59am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
hhmason
paint the brick! paint the trim and paint the front door. Take porch cover off completely or redo with a flat roof
November 14, 2012 at 7:04am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
greenthumb2
what? please tell us why painting brick is an optimal choice when it lasts for 50+ years?
November 14, 2012 at 7:32am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
houssaon
Please don't paint the brick. Why add a $10,000 maintenance project that needs to be done every 7 to 10 years, when you have attractive brick?
November 14, 2012 at 7:38am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
gerrycabc
This is my dream home! (Shutters would be my immediate budget friendly choice). I wonder why your husband liked it so much?
November 14, 2012 at 8:12am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Granite Transformations
Hi hik226,

I'd say shutters and a new door would go a long way. I'd even consider painting the trim around the windows too. I think most people like the idea of black shutters, I'd have to agree. Either a red, dark blue or wood door would be my suggestion.

A nice hanging light fixture on the front entryway would do a lot too.

Good luck!
November 14, 2012 at 8:16am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
karelina
I'd do one more thing besides painting the door, adding shutters, and finding more interesting sconces. I'd replace the stair rails with handmade railings. The pic is just one idea. Houzz had an article on rails with many other examples.
November 14, 2012 at 8:21am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
marcie31
I'm sorry, but I think your headline says it all - "It was not my first choice." I sense a power struggle here. Before you do any remodeling you need to make peace with this house and his decision (why "HE" bought it and not you as a couple is another issue), or you will never be happy with it. You might start with considering how very, very fortunate you are to be able to afford such a big, lovely home. Count your blessings, not your complaints.
November 14, 2012 at 8:42am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
tabula
Don't have any new ideas, but just wanted to say - I kinda love your house. Add a porch that wraps the front of the house, change the porch roof angle to reflect the house roof, and grow colorful hydrangeas in pots on both sides of the the climbing stairs, and I'll be envious!
November 14, 2012 at 8:53am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
riddleskitty
I wouldn't paint the brick, it usually ends up looking tacky and starts flaking pretty easily. What I would do, is STAIN the brick. It'll show the texture and color variance of the brick, but allow you to select a color that pleases you. A dark grey stain with light trim, or a light whitewash with taupe trim would be very nice. With whatever you end up doing here, go for contrast.

The meatball bushes have to go. Replace them with plants in a variety of texture and size, but keep the color palette monochromatic. Also agree you need to fill the gable on the front porch. It looks off and hollow. The house has great symmetrical bones, and with a little work, it can look amazing.
November 14, 2012 at 10:58am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Lenam Kvarnstrm
Reshape the roof of the porch to the same envelop form as the main house's. Paint all white details grey and give the garden a well coming appearance with bushes and trees.
November 14, 2012 at 11:09am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Vicki D
I think the primary problem is the porch - the gable specifically, it is a different pitch than the roof has. I think a different style would improve it greatly (something that compliments vs mimics). Another thought is to change out your door, it's a bit too standard. There are companies that just change the glass (can increase the size of the glass also) and they have styles ranging from contemporary to Asian to midwestern. If your door needs replacing, consider something totally different like a set of double doors or if you want to retain the side light(s) maybe one with a decorative styled transome light.
November 14, 2012 at 11:11am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
volleyball1mom
Amen Marci31! I consider myself old fashioned but I couldn't come up with ideas for the home improvement b/c I was stuck on the first sentence "My husband bought this house"
November 14, 2012 at 11:45am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
lizoregon
I guess I read too many advice columns, but I have to kindly suggest that if your husband bought a house you aren't happy with, you have more serious problems than "street appeal." I can't imagine a loving husband unilaterally making such an expensive decision and dismissing your concerns and wishes. Is this just an investment? Is your name not on the title? Sorry, but this just raises so many questions and red flags for me that I can't begin to think about street appeal. Good for you for making the best of it, but perhaps your focus needs to be on what the first sentence of your title conveys. All the best to you.
November 14, 2012 at 11:50am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
kara9
Lots of excellent suggestions. The best, in my opinion, are: appropriately sized shutters, paint front door, extend steps. Then the best of all, change gable to hip or something consistent w roof, beef up columns appropriately sized and trimmed. Later when you need a new roof, change the color to a darker architectural shingle. Having said all that, I like your house and the imperfections allow you to make it yours! Also, had it been perfect, you would most likely have paid more. Enjoy. Also, my uncle one time bought a house when the family was moving w/out his wife present and they were VERY happy. Sometimes logistics call for unusual results.
November 14, 2012 at 12:01pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
judianna20
hlk226, besides the issues with the exterior, I took another look and realized what a nice lot you have. In the future, think about a flat roof addition on the side with a colonial railing running around the perimeter and lots and lots of windows that will give you gorgeous light. Mine was off the dining room side and we used it a lot for the wine/cheese and crackers thing before dinner. It was so cozy.

November 14, 2012 at 12:13pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
bygeorgi
Nice house....Play up the georgian style . I agree with most people , you must add shutters to the second floor windows and color to the front door. Deep grey -green on the shutters and consider a kind of acid green on the front door, sounds strange but it would update the style and if you add plant material such as coleus with bright leaves it will make whats right now kinda blah into wow! Also close of the gable front porch top and add a single hanging light centered above. And where the walkway meets the side walk on each side a brick pillar and maybe even a small cascade of white picket fence and some white roses and more coleus would be lovely.Keep in mind scale of your projects, the house is quite large so don't go dainty, take down the porch railing also.
November 14, 2012 at 1:21pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
careclare
Most of these folks are crazy. Or wealthy. Your house is adorable, if a little boxy. Your impulses are right...trying to soften the box. Nice brick, nice setting. It would be great to fix the porch roof at some point. I think the walkway is inviting. The front door will only be improved if you get the color right. Add tall, skinny trees on each front corner, do shutters ( a warm brown,I think) and see how it goes.
November 14, 2012 at 2:57pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
frankjohn
Keep it simple and inexpensive. Paint the front door a stand out color. Add shutters to the second floor windows in paler shade of the front door. Add two taller bushes in colorful planters towards front of the porch. Try this before anything else and you may be surprised....
November 14, 2012 at 5:09pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
frankjohn
Keep it simple and inexpensive. Paint the front door a stand out color. Add shutters to the second floor windows in paler shade of the front door. Add two taller bushes in colorful planters towards front of the porch. Try this before anything else and you may be surprised....
November 14, 2012 at 5:09pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
anitajoyce
Your house has nice curb appeal. Shutters are needed for the front windows for better curb appeal. You could go with black or a brownish-rust color and a door in one of same colors as the shutters. Closing in the open framing above the door would help greatly also. It looks unfinished. Good luck and please post photos of your house.
November 14, 2012 at 5:20pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Karen Tiede Art Rugs
+1 on this comment: Reshape the roof of the porch to the same envelop form as the main house's.

But on a different note, "curb appeal" is not today's problem, unless you're planning to flip it. Live with it for a while. See what you think come spring. (The porch isn't right; time won't help that. I'm guessing a previous owner fell in love with a picture and copied it without thinking, or it was her son's HS carpentry project?) But still... you have other things to keep you busy, and it's november.

I know plenty of families where one person had to pick a house in a hurry, often without being able to consult. Phones make showing pictures easier, but even that doesn't solve all of it. No reflection on the health of your marriage at all; more about the stresses of having to move when you don't have time to shop or make a lot of visits to the new town.

My father picked a bunch of the places we live in, the Marine Corps picked more, and my mother probably only had a choice in 3. They're still married, 54 years later. You'll do fine.
November 14, 2012 at 6:09pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
thiller
Can't tell whether the brick is dark enough, but I have always liked this kind of paint combo with brick, kind of elegant with the darker trim:
November 14, 2012 at 7:17pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
blairblake
I think if you put in larger pillars you would be amazed at the feeling... Also add shutters
November 15, 2012 at 5:15pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
frenchdecor
Shatters look good only if they supposedly cover window even if they are decorative, therefore, first floor windows shouldn't have shutters, it will look obviously fake and odd. There were so many good suggestions. Good luck.
November 16, 2012 at 2:14pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Sheila
shutters and a hot pink door,
November 16, 2012 at 9:51pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
mas4tune
I agree with the shutters- I recommend them in black as well as a bright colored door either red or even a deep periwinkle. If it is in budget you may want to consider painting the exterior brick the gray color of the house that someone posted a picture above (labelled green basements). Add some pretty impatiens to your garden and you will have a beautiful home! In my opinion the exterior of the house is not bad- you have all the basics and don't have any major structural changes. It just needs a cosmetic makeover which is easy and affordable.
November 16, 2012 at 10:12pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
parisgirl1970
First thought.Looking directly at it--it's lobsided b/c the left side looks so bare as the incline goes upppp. I'd fill the front left side in w/ a few trees. Thick and thin. Some evergreens b/c they don't lose their leaves in the winter -if you even have a winter. Next, yes paint that door-but make sure it's a color YOU love b/c you'll be staring at it at least once a day or for a while. Love the unilock path. Get some flowers and seasonal plants growing around the front so it won't look so sterile. If you go online you'll find when different bushes flower or change color during each season. Shutters a must--you'll love the look. If you're into drama, maybe a small fountain by the side of the railing. You never said what your budget was, but make notes of things you love on similar homes and find someone who's good & hungry so you can do more w/ the $ you have to spend.
November 16, 2012 at 10:15pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
parisgirl1970
First thought.Looking directly at it--it's lobsided b/c the left side looks so bare as the incline goes upppp. I'd fill the front left side in w/ a few trees. Thick and thin. Some evergreens b/c they don't lose their leaves in the winter -if you even have a winter. Next, yes paint that door-but make sure it's a color YOU love b/c you'll be staring at it at least once a day or for a while. Love the unilock path. Get some flowers and seasonal plants growing around the front so it won't look so sterile. If you go online you'll find when different bushes flower or change color during each season. Shutters a must--you'll love the look. If you're into drama, maybe a small fountain by the side of the railing. You never said what your budget was, but make notes of things you love on similar homes and find someone who's good & hungry so you can do more w/ the $ you have to spend.
November 16, 2012 at 10:16pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
parisgirl1970
First thought.Looking directly at it--it's lobsided b/c the left side looks so bare as the incline goes upppp. I'd fill the front left side in w/ a few trees. Thick and thin. Some evergreens b/c they don't lose their leaves in the winter -if you even have a winter. Next, yes paint that door-but make sure it's a color YOU love b/c you'll be staring at it at least once a day or for a while. Love the unilock path. Get some flowers and seasonal plants growing around the front so it won't look so sterile. If you go online you'll find when different bushes flower or change color during each season. Shutters a must--you'll love the look. If you're into drama, maybe a small fountain by the side of the railing. You never said what your budget was, but make notes of things you love on similar homes and find someone who's good & hungry so you can do more w/ the $ you have to spend.
November 16, 2012 at 10:16pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
ravi kaneriya
NICE..........
November 16, 2012 at 10:20pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
jagood
When you can, take a good high resolution digital photo straight on from the front and crop out almost everything except the house, convert it to black and white, and print it out, and then make copies as light as you can print them and still see the details. Now use these copies to make sketches (on top of the photo) of some of the ideas you've been given. This technique really helps me to visualize things. You can use colored pencils to add color to your sketches.
November 16, 2012 at 10:31pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Deb Reinhart
The home is a classic brick 2 story. The gable is disproportioned, and too minimal for the home.

If you like the convenience of having shelter on the front door area build up the proportions. The columns are way too thin.
Fill in the gable, add moldings, beef up the pillars and widen the sidewalk.

Most importantly, hire an architect whose work includes classic homes you like. These design challenges are best resolved in collaboration with home owner (s) preferences.
November 16, 2012 at 10:38pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
kcrocombe
Shutters and paint the door a different color than the shutters. The landscape bed around the perimeter of the house could be much, much deeper and making it curved, deeper in some places than others would help give it more interest, too. Some larger foundation plants along with the smaller sized ones would give the landscape some interest. It's a pretty house already, and with a few changes, it will really stand out!
November 16, 2012 at 11:49pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Avedon Designs
"Fill" in the triangel pediment. The open look isnt good,. That should be all white. Then add shutters in a color that match the new color of the front door, black, dark blue, forest green, etc.
November 17, 2012 at 2:31am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
aschmitz
Start some street trees now. You have a really nice, wide planting strip. Put in some good shade trees and sit back. In ten years you'll be so glad you have them! Also, get rid of that funny looking porch roof. it doesn't match the house & looks like a do-it-yourself add on.
November 17, 2012 at 11:59am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Ann Smitt
Re:aschmitz suggestion
Before you plant anything on the planting strip by the road, check to see if the city plumbing lines run through this area. Also call the gas and electric companies re: buried power lines, they'll send someone out to mark the areas affected with flags.
I hope you just enjoy your beautiful, new house and making personal a little project at a time.
November 17, 2012 at 12:34pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
rhozi
add a wrap around porch. it looks naked as is.
November 17, 2012 at 1:20pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
lessismoore
Hi There - I took the liberty of adding a revised porch roof with bolder posts. This is also lower than your existing one. Added shutters and window boxes, but I still want more - Would like to see bolder window trim to balance the porch and better hold shutters. I did a "treatment" on the bottom ones. Not sure what the little topper is called (pediment? plinth?) just and idea - but black or white? Love the idea of a side addition on this as suggested by JudyG.
November 17, 2012 at 3:31pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
the essentials inside
Hi hlk226 & everyone! Kinda feel like I'm butting in here but just saw a blurb in my feed and had to come see what lessismoore did w/this one. lessismoore - you are awesome!

hlk226 - you have a lovely home. As you can see, just needs a few changes.

Lyvonne
www.essentialsinside.com
November 17, 2012 at 3:44pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
lessismoore
:-) Lyvonne Thanks!
November 17, 2012 at 5:18pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
lessismoore
:-) Lyvonne Thanks!
November 17, 2012 at 5:19pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
hlk226
Lessismore, oh my you people are wonderful! So awesome the pic that you did. I should elanorate that my husband does agree that it lacks "something". Never thought I would get marriage advice too :). I received more ideas than I ever imagined. Lots of ideas that are affordable and quick. Will live with it for a little while before major changes. I so appreciate your help! Thank you
November 17, 2012 at 6:07pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Ann Smitt
hlk226 Wishing you and your family a wonderful Thanksgiving celebration in your new home. Enjoy.
November 18, 2012 at 5:24am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
tati
Spontaneously, I would say that the path needs to be centered. The left tree and the shift of the path brings in an "off balance" feel.
November 18, 2012 at 8:26am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
lessismoore
I just figured out that the ornamental additions are called "lintels" and if my internet research is correct, very much an element of "Federalist" style architecture. As is that kind of (revised) porch door cover, as are the side lights on the door, etc.
November 18, 2012 at 11:15am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
lessismoore
I just figured out that the ornamental additions above the windows are called "lintels" and if my internet research is correct, very much an element of "Federalist" style architecture. As is that kind of (revised) porch door cover, as are the side lights on the door, etc.
November 18, 2012 at 11:15am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
cyn222
Tons of great idea..here some plants to show how it could spruce up the front a bit.
November 20, 2012 at 12:12am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
thickskin
@cyn222, Great job!!!!!!! Most, including myself, suggested additions to the house which can bust a budget. Looking at your plan I would also trim that big tree to the roof line, and if code allows it, add some small trees on that wide grassy area on the sidewalk.
November 20, 2012 at 5:21am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
charlotteleigh
Your house is great. I think after you live there a little while you'll know more what you like and don't like about it. I agree with filling in the dormer, maybe widening the steps and getting rid of the railing. With your skills in landscaping and decorating I'm sure your house will stand out in no time. Still, as it stands, it is a pretty house with loads of potential. Thanks for sharing it and good luck with your changes!
November 23, 2012 at 1:44am   
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Exterior Colors
What color roof/shingles would complement the house?...
I need to find a stone mason familiar with the style of the Greene Bro
I want to recreate a Greene and Greene style bungalow...
Exterior color for our bland white brick house?
We're having a difficult time coming up with a color...
Need help to find right rug , coffee tables and ottoman .
Hello, dear houzz designers really need your advice...
POLL: Carpet or Hardwood?
Do you prefer carpet or hardwood as your go-to flooring...
People viewed this after searching for:
The content on this page is provided by Houzz and is subject to the Houzz terms of use, copyright and privacy policy.
Copyright claims: contact the Houzz designated agent.