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Original oak trim.. eww:( What to do!?!
baileyteach
November 14, 2012 in Design Dilemma
Alright, I get it. Painting the original oak trim in my house would be a sin AND devalue the home. :( But what if I hate the look of it. Is there a way to have white trim and not devalue my home? Am I the only person who thinks wood trim looks outdated and dirty? I want a modern, clean and shabby chic look to my home.
The upstairs trim is white, and if it was the other way (white trim on main floor and wood trim upstairs) I would be a happy girl!

Should I just paint it white to make myself happy, and devalue my home:(?

Could I remove the original oak trim, store it until i'm ready to sell the home and get new trim that I like?

Is there a way to refinish the oak wood trim to make it look more modern, clean and make the floors pop as well as white trim would?

Unless there is a color of paint that would really go with the wood floors and trim, I don't think just painting the walls is enough. Any wall paint suggestions would be nice.

What are my options here??? HELP!
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Keerthi Naidu
Personally, I love the look of white trim and I see no problem in painting it! But if you're concerned about painting the trim, how about staining it a darker color and using neutral wall colors and fabrics to brighten up the space?
4 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:04AM
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marewalker7
I agree, staining the wood darker would give it more contemporary look
2 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:09AM
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mmilos
Paint out that trim white! Keep the stair handrail and steps the wood. Your hardwood floors would look fantastic with the white contrast. Painted nice wood trim is still nice wood trim.

I don't agree painting white will devalue your home. Use a latex paint and it can be painstakenly restored by a different owner if they want the wood back.

Use a creamy white to give it a richer look. Too bright may cheapen the look.

Go for it!
8 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:23AM
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Natalie
If you like contemporary then PAINT it! Be a HAPPY GIRL!!!
5 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:24AM
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greenthumb2
Unless green is something you are fond of, I would paint walls a different color. Look at some shabby chic and french country design books and find your bliss. Clip and put in a wish binder, or make a list of what you like. In the meantime, ditch that funky brass fireplace cover and find something shabby chic. Find a rug color you like. Go lightly if you really want to liven your space. Once you light your floor and your walls with carpet and paint, find a window covering you can mount outside and above your wood frames. Will cover them and give you your look.

Ditch the rattan shades obviously but save for another property or donate. Do not take off your trim. Consult with finish carpenter and ask them: 1) how much to remove and replace with cheap pine painted white, 2) how much to put original wood back up at time of resale, 3) is there a product that would allow you to white wash without painting and get the real shabby chic look which could be sanding later?

Ultimately, it is your home. You may end up there for 10 years. If you know you will sell in less than five -- don't paint the wood. Five years is a blink. Maybe you can rethink an entire home of shabby chic. I knew a lady whose dining room table and chairs were so dynamic it didnt matter that the rest of her home was more craftsman. She had boho style through and through. Great art everywhere...True story. She lived in the wilderness.... So, you can use both styles together if you have great piece of furniture and right accessories. Besides, you will take those with when you sell the home.... Enjoy your process.
1 Like   November 14, 2012 at 10:30AM
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baileyteach
Wow, I'm getting more positive answers, than I have gotten from people I've discussed this with.:) I am very surprised.
5 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:30AM
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mmilos
Adding to my suggestion above, if you want to tread lightly and are concerned about painting trim white:

I would suggest start by painting your walls a color you like...A cool, light gray may contemporize the room enough. Add your furniture and accessories and live with it for a bit. If it still isn't what you like, hire a good painter to paint out the trim.
2 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:39AM
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judianna20
Would the intrinsic value of your home be the style, the age and history? If so, I can understand the reasoning behind not painting the woodwork. But, if the house is not a "true" anything, then paint it! It is fabulous trim, either way! Would cost a fortune to put it in a new house today.
5 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:40AM
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cheapdiva
Paint, paint, paint! We have the same old, dark wood trim in our 100+ home and all of the trim has been painted white.
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:59AM
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groveraxle
I am assuming from the radiators that this is an original Craftsman, not a reproduction. If so, it's in spectacular condition. That said, many Craftsman homes were built intending for the woodwork to be painted. In fact, some (like mine) were built with fir subfloors that were immediately covered with linoleum. And while I do love the natural wood, painting it would not be a sacrilege.
Office
Sheri Olson
Urban Oasis
6 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 11:04AM
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PRO
Inspired Interiors by Wendi, IIDA
I concur with the above comments. Paint the trim white!
3 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 11:10AM
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baileyteach
Wow, the Sheri Olson photo is exactly what I had pictured in my head, only with a slightly darker shade of gray. Beautiful. This is helping to ease my mind about painting the oak.
4 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 11:10AM
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judianna20
groveraxle, I never knew that about the wood actually was meant to be painted. We don't have many Craftsman style around here and the natural woodwork in most of the old houses was that dirty looking gumwood, which I understand now is an endangered species. Go figure.
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 11:36AM
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lk_designs
My view is paint it white. If it's what you want go for it.
1 Like   November 14, 2012 at 11:46AM
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Aja Mazin
You do not require permission to paint your woodwork.
5 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 11:57AM
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baileyteach
Aja, that's my favorite comment yet. Thank you. I just have a hard time doing what people I know tell me not to. I think I'll put my "big girl" pants on before I start painting.:)
10 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 12:07PM
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Aleisha Butler
I am all for painting wood when it needs it, but at least according to the pictures your floors and trim look to be in fantastic shape. (I find myself feeling it would be a shame to paint it). One of the things you might not be fond of is the wide expanses of hardwood that nearly match the trim, and if you break that up when you get furnishings in there, with nice light area rugs and light, airy slipcovered furniture, it might do the work for you. However, it is your home and you should be happy in it. If the stained trim is going to give you nightmares, go ahead and paint it, but I feel like you really should leave the fireplace and the staircase alone, they're so beautifully crafted.
3 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 12:39PM
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margaret700
I have lived in my house for 40 years with the ugly dark woodwork. Nobody would let me paint it, and I still want to. I say go for it!!!
8 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 12:59PM
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Leigh Durand
Start small. Paint the window trim white first. Leave the fireplace, baseboards etc. It will be lighter and brighter but you will still preserve some of the wood feel. I painted my window trim and it opened up the space and enhanced the view. Good luck!
1 Like   November 14, 2012 at 1:25PM
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Angela Guinnip
you should too Margaret. You have had to live with it for 40 years. Tell them to hush and get to painting.
5 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 1:26PM
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Angela Guinnip
Quit making it about money and start making it about happy.
3 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 1:28PM
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dcer
Paint it!!!! Nice house, by the way:)
2 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 1:35PM
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PRO
Prime Siding and General Carpentry
Honestly, paint it. And that's coming from a person who prefers wood grain and pretty much hates white trim. As a carpenter, 99% of the trim we do is painted pine work, so I personally don't like it as I find it bland and unoriginal. However, it's not about me, it's about you. Make the room the way you want to and be happy about it.
You'll want to lightly sand all the clear coated trim wood so that the new paint has something to grab onto (sanding will rough up the surface). Then apply a primer. The problem here is knowing whether or not the clear coat on the wood is oil or water based. I would go with an oil based primer though. After that, you can use whatever paint you want on top of that (latex or oil, any finish, color etc).
If you don't like the dimensions, it shouldn't be all that expensive to replace the trim in your house. Takes less than a day to install. If you're painting it, its even cheaper. Trim work is not that hard to do either if you're so inclined.
However, the only caveat that I would give is the same as mentioned before. Do ONE window first and see how you like it. If you like it, do all the windows in the room. If you still like it, do all the trim. But don't do anymore than one room and furnish and sit in it to see if you like it. One room is easier to fix than an entire house.
7 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 2:47PM
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lionnessone
Have you thought about Ebony stain?
I think it would be beautiful if you stain all trim including the ceiling beams, banisters, and stairs in Ebony.
Paint your risers, and spindles white.
I would install built-in window seating with storage on both sides of the fireplace. Have the seating stained Ebony and the storage area painted white.
Have a professional install radiators covers; they will complete your room. You will have a place to display some of your favorite items.
You have many options to ponder, good luck.
2 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 2:54PM
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Claudia
Nothing makes a room look fresher that crisp white trim on the windows.
2 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 3:03PM
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PRO
Prime Siding and General Carpentry
Do not use a radiator cover as a shelf. Heat rises, so the top of the cover should be allowed to vent heat up as well as out the front. This will allow for optimal air circulation from the heat source.
1 Like   November 14, 2012 at 3:06PM
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mmonika
Paint it :-) You will still be able to see the grain of the wood after painting so when its time to sell, you can still post OAK trim and just let the next people decide what to do :-) Real wood trim does look different then those cheap mdf boards and it will be beautiful :-)
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 3:46PM
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eckjunebug
I love the look of having the walls and trim all the same color, in an older home like yours. Very crispy clean and cool. I would absolutely go with white.
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 3:53PM
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eckjunebug



This isn't the best picture of the idea of all white... But sort of. You could play with some wall color in a couple rooms, but the main living areas all white, with some added great art, would make for a very cool look.
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 4:00PM
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PRO
Prime Siding and General Carpentry
I don't think you'll see any grain by painting your wood trim. It looks stained and clear coated, which means the paint will never touch the actual wood, just the clear coat.
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 4:31PM
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janishill
Paint it an enjoy. It's your house! :-)
1 Like   November 14, 2012 at 4:43PM
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inkwitch
Before you paint, find everything you have to do to it. Consult an expert. They don't have to know why you want to do it, and you don't have to justify yourself to anyone. But to do it right and have it look professional, educate yourself.

And not too white.

That oak is gorgeous, though. Is your house a craftsman style or just an old house?
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 4:49PM
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jweber71
I will give you the advice once given to me - don't paint 300 year old furniture or anything crafted by a pilgrim but paint the oak trim - we did it in our home and now have a uniform crisp white trim throughout and we LOVE it - you are blessed to have all of the builtins - I would paint it in a heartbeat but I would have it done by a pro if you can stomach the cost. I went with a pure white which requires two coats after primer so it is pricey BUT I prefer crisp white white rather than the decorator white that many painters will try to offer - its easier on them but has a cool tone that I don't like as much as the crisp white. Please place pictures when it's completed. Your home is beautiful.
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 4:50PM
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dawnbc1
I didn't paint the oak trim in my last house and I wanted to. Finally sold the house and the first thing the new owner did was paint the trim. Does that help? ;)
4 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 4:53PM
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kitter
.One should decorate to match a house's style, not ruin it by imposing whatever decor is popular at the moment e.g. shabby chic., 29 years ago, everyone was stripping paint off fireplace brick & oak trim, cursing previous owners. 20 years ago they'll probably be doing it again.
Instead, embrace & embellish your house's personal style which includes wonderful wood. You're lucky it's not cheap, 60's mahogany.
6 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 5:11PM
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margaret700
Most of the homes in Colonial America had painted woodwork!
1 Like   November 14, 2012 at 5:13PM
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2eatcrow
Oak is expensive and beautiful. Save the paint for cheapo stuff.
6 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 5:31PM
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vardanega
making a house beautiful IS increasing the value. Paint!
1 Like   November 14, 2012 at 5:49PM
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Lisa Hartmann
I am in the long and tedious process of painting out all my oak trim. But it's worth it!! I had so many people tell me not to do it, but now when they see it they are amazed. You do what you want to do. It's your house and you have to live there
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 7:42PM
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margaret700
One thing I will say about natural woodwork, It is very easy to take care of. My kitchen and bathroom woodwork are painted and I am forever cleaning and painting them. The rest of the house is all natural and I just wipe it down every so often. It never shows the dirt and of course never needs to be painted, which is a very big job.
3 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 7:58PM
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gunnsharon
Well I thought I wanted all natural wood trim when we installed our new hardwood floors, We replaced our narrow 70's floor, door and window moldings through the complete house with wider more detailed custom wood molding. We painted it white . A great craftsman did the carpentry work and we painted. After two coats of bin primer and sanding and two coats of finish low sheen white waterbased laquer it looks and feels fantastic. If I was to go this route again I would have professional painters they would have it done much faster, Go for it paint it white but if you can have professional painters in as it is a big job to do every room in a your home and as well put up with the mess and turmoil over a long period.
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 8:55PM
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kah416
It's your home, so do what you feel like! I LOVE the original woodwork but my 1916 house has white painted trim and I LOVE it...it just freshens things up and makes it look bright. You could leave some parts of the trim the original wood and have other parts/rooms painted white...??? I don't think you can go wrong with white, I love it. Our staircase is white and original wood and it compliments very well. I love your wall color!
2 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 9:58PM
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victorianbungalowranch
This looks like an original early 20th century home (Foursquare?) that was stripped and refinished to a lighter shade back when honey oak was popular. Originally the floors probably would have been finished with an amber shellac (about the color they are now) and the wood would have had a darker finish.

Generally only some bedrooms, kitchens and bathrooms had painted finishes in this style of house, and a lesser wood, such as pine or poplar, would have been used if it was intended to be painted. Oak has an open grain that may show through paint and is generally more expensive than other woods. I see you have strapwork on the ceilings too. Somebody went through a huge amount of work to do all that and if you are thinking about selling in the future, it would be a shame to cover all of it up. However, it would be possible to lightly sand and refinish to a darker shade.
http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/techniques/archive/2012/04/09/t-amp-t-sip-t-ps-amp-techniques-for-fantastic-oak-finishes.aspx http://www.monicawantsit.com/2012/02/staining-oak-cabinets-espresso-color.html

As Kah416 suggested, perhaps you could select just areas to paint so the next owner isn't cursing you out, because styles and tastes change every 15-20 years or so. In about 5-10 years all that "clean" woodwork will start to lose its luster and show signs of wear and start to chip, so it will be repainted and eventually be a big mess. If that is as long as you want it to last, do the next owners a favor and sand very lightly so the paint strips off fairly easily..

One area that is particularly hard to strip and to paint is the inside frames of windows and it can cause to make them hard to open if not done with great care. This becomes a greater problem with each coat. of paint. Stripping paint from panelled doors and trim is also difficult, and handrailings, newel posts and any place with deep crevices. I think the staircase is particularly beautiful and would only paint the banisters, if anything. They have such a slender graceful shape. The mantel, the built ins (but not the pink color) and the French doors are beautiful too.

Keeping those outstanding features and only painting the flat casings(window frames, door frames, inside built-ins and baseboards) could be a compromise and look nice too and take less time. And I have seen shabby chic done with natural wood finishes in the mix..
4 Likes   November 15, 2012 at 12:30AM
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Jane Fowler
I agree, use a creamier white, not white-white. We "toned" down all the really white on our trim and it really made a nice difference!
0 Likes   November 15, 2012 at 1:31AM
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Jane Fowler
I agree, use a creamier white, not white-white. We "toned" down all the really white on our trim and it really made a nice difference!
0 Likes   November 15, 2012 at 1:31AM
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Ljiljana Pejic
Oh dear, you are sitting on the fence and now we all are giving more advice that do not mach!!
I had hard time deciding should I paint - and in which colour - my wooden kitchen cabinets - and decided to go with the white-wash so that it is lighter, it shows wood grain, and it still can be re-painted/striped; of course - the colour turned to be sandy-off-white which I still have not changed!! So if you like shaby - there you are! I don't know how white wash will look combined with plain white upstairs..
And I agree with 'lionnessone' - particulary like pic of Arden Park..ideas of combining it with ebony...are also interesting..
I do not think that plain wood does not need additional care - it does, it maybe just ages more gracefully, and does not show so much...My final word: too much of too bright white(walls, trims..) looks hospital-like !
Hmm, good luck to you!!
0 Likes   November 15, 2012 at 6:08AM
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my3bears
my home has wood trim with a white stain (white wash) I have a very light look with wood grain. The best of both worlds! Love it.
1 Like   November 15, 2012 at 7:09AM
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mtnparkway
I'm going through the same dilemma. We just purchased a 1925 craftsman with woodwork in the adjoining living and dining rooms. The detailing is beautiful but I wanted to paint the woodwork for a fresh, clean look. Everyone told me not to do it so of course I didn't. Now I'm unhappy with the whole look. I struggled for 2 weeks to find a wall paint color that complimented the caramel colored woodwork but it's still not working for me. If you have painted, congrats...wish I had done the same. These comments have me considering a "do-over"
1 Like   November 22, 2012 at 4:17AM
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agarcia3201
I am jealous of your woodwork. I find myself wanting to say don't paint it. I do like the idea of staining it in ebony like someone suggested. I think it would give it a more contemoporary feel and would not be shabby chic at all. Unless your home is historical and has all original everything else, I guess you can just paint over it. Please let us know what you do!
0 Likes   November 22, 2012 at 8:28AM
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margaret700
I hope baileyteach lets us know what she decides to do! I can't wait to hear...
0 Likes   November 24, 2012 at 7:36PM
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baileyteach
Alright, my gut is telling me to start painting. Now to choose white white or a creamy white? And figure out how to do it all myself. I have 6 months before I'm moving in, so I have enough time to do it myself without hiring a professional. And what to do with the fireplace. I may leave the wood finish on the fireplace.

I'm thinking light gray walls with white wood furniture with a tan rug on the floor tan couch and colorful chairs.
OR
Beige walls with black wood furniture with a tan rug on the floor, tan couch and colorful chairs.

Any help hints? Window coverings? Fireplace ideas? Stairs ideas?

Or should I stain everything ebony instead?
0 Likes   November 26, 2012 at 8:11AM
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victorianbungalowranch
Antique white is better than white white for your style of house, and prime first. Ebony is a bit dark for that kind of woodwork--walnut or mahogoney is more like it.

Perhaps you can finid an inconspicuous corner to experiment a bit on the baseboard in a back hallway or something, or clear coat a piece of Oak and try it out. If you keep the fireplace, I would consider keeping some of the other woodwork too, like the built ins and the paneling by the staircase.

If you posted inspirational photos from Houzz it will help others to help you with the decor.
0 Likes   November 26, 2012 at 10:42AM
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Kim D
It looks like a craftsman house, which means wood everywhere....but it is your house so do what will make you feel that you home is raising up to greet you every time you walk in the door.
0 Likes   November 26, 2012 at 10:49AM
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Aja Mazin
Try one window and see how it goes.
If it goes well and you like it and enjoy it, then continue!

HOWEVER, I HATE TO PAINT!

I hate to paint trim and/or walls.
I end up with a big mess and paint everywhere, so I no longer even try.

However, I can use homemade chalk paint or milk paint on old furniture finds and
even my mother-in-law is impressed.
0 Likes   November 26, 2012 at 5:18PM
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baileyteach
Alright friends, I have painted the living room and dining room, what do you think???
4 Likes   January 2, 2013 at 6:47PM
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victorianbungalowranch
I think the color really brings out the floors. I think I would have picked a more taupe or greige (warm grey), but it could work with some art and color and a bigger rug. The light fixture seems oddly placed. I would get radiator covers or paint them (a total pain) to match the walls.

The dining room table might relate better with some seat cushions in a light color or stripe with the grey and brown tones in it. I could also see the table in white or something to contrast with all the chairs, or maybe having fewer on the sides so you can see more than a jumble of legs. If there is any way to lower the light (nice period style and nice white shades) that would make it feel more intimate. The rug is too small under the table--the chairs almost feel like they might fall off if you pull them out. like they are huddled on a raft :). Perhaps the rug in the living room would work.

So what kind of accent colors are you planning to use?
0 Likes   January 2, 2013 at 7:14PM
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groveraxle
I think it looks great. The cooler color looks much better. Are you happier with the wood trim now that you've painted the walls?

I don't know what your plan is for window coverings, but the current shades have a yellow cast that is jarring. I would remove them until you decide what to do. You could even replace them with those cheap paper accordion shades from Home Depot in the meantime.
0 Likes   January 2, 2013 at 7:23PM
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2eatcrow
It looks marvelous! I agree withvictorianbungalowranch (wow what a long name) a larger rug and some art on the all will make it look even better. I really like the color you chose.
0 Likes   January 2, 2013 at 7:33PM
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margaret700
Excellent! Did you decide not to paint the woodwork? I'm glad because it's so nice. You've done a beautiful job.
0 Likes   January 2, 2013 at 8:06PM
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baileyteach
Victorian, I love your vision! My accent colors will be cream and red, deep red, not maroon though. I'll have to talk my husband into a bigger rug, those things are expensive! I really haven't looked much for finishing touches, like seat cushions, but that will come with time.

Grover, I am more comfortable with the wood actually now. And the window coverings will come with time. Those curtains are the cheapies that came already in our house. I'm thinking of some cream very light curtains, with honeycomb blinds the help energy costs.

Any helpful decor tips would be great, like what kinds of furniture to buy and furniture placement, wall decor ideas, what to do with the electronics on the fire place, etc.
0 Likes   January 2, 2013 at 8:12PM
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jillmeng
Love the walls. Now finish the look. PAINT THE TRIM! You will be soooooo happy you did. The house is very pretty. The trim will make it gorgeous!
2 Likes   January 2, 2013 at 8:16PM
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victorianbungalowranch
Deep red is one of my favorite colors. I especially like tribal type rugs and ethnic embroidery and such, and found that I was always drawn to the reds. Handwoven rugs are expensive, but the flat weaves aren't so bad and beautiful too, and pillows can be not so bad if you look around, esp. just the covers.

Rugs are expensive==I think Rugs USA has some decent sales if you watch for them, and World Market is pretty good on side chairs and such. I love old Danish Modern, which is becoming quite popular these days, and it is a cousin to the bungalow, I think.

Pottery Barn has some nice plush ones--I hesitated on one on clearance because the colors were more muted than I wanted and it added up to get the biggest size, and because I impulsively ordered a smaller one on One Kings Lane just prior. Still regret that I didn't get it. the prices never get lower than clearance except sometimes for the small ones.

Speaking of One Kings Lane, sometimes they have some interesting stuff for reasonable prices--it is all over the map that way. Fun to look at, and periodically have nice outdoor rugs on special., which can work well in high traffic areas and in the dining room.

Stenciled floorcloths are very period, and quite practical because you can just sweep the crumbs off. You can even make them on the backside of a piece of scrap vinyl. Cutting Edge Stencils has some great ones and you can google directions on how to make a floorcloth. Then you could put the dining room rug in the living room to create another seating or work area, perhaps under the pendant.
0 Likes   January 2, 2013 at 8:57PM
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Natalie
It looks very nice... I'm not into the sofa on an angle but it's hard to see the entire room. Perhaps centering it opposite FP will look better. A couple of kilim ottomans, bench, or chairs would add some interest and will give you the red as well as other hues I think you could introduce. The light fixtures can be sprayed with Rustoleum in oil rubbed bronze finish---will freshen them up a bit. Both need to be lowered-one at stairs, place a round table underneath and chair(s). Pics for inspiration. Looking forward to more photos. Good Luck!
[houzz=][houzz=
]http://www.mixfurniture.com/Los_Angeles_Antique_Furniture_Store_ShowProduct.cfm?productID=2345 http://shop.yurdan.com/Catalog/Products/Index/43339/kilim-stool-31989
0 Likes   January 2, 2013 at 9:32PM
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jillmeng
You know you want to or you wouldn't be contemplating this to such an extent....PAINT THE TRIM!!!
1 Like   January 3, 2014 at 7:08AM
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margaret700
How about an update, bailyteach. Would love to see some pictures.
1 Like   January 3, 2014 at 3:59PM
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douglasmcbride
Looks great -- i am building a new home, but with period style detailing - and am using similar stained craftsman style wood trim -- i wrestled with the idea of stained oak vs paint for a while, but a lot of people use the painted stuff merely so they can cut material costs it seems (not in all cases) --- i wanted a timeless look (others told me to use Maple, maple is all the rage now too ) but stained oak will continue to quietly soldier on for decades more as a nice traditional trim material -- not the cheapest , i just got the bill for my 6 panel solid core doors - egads - but my home will hopefully be enjoyed by me for many years, ----- then if my descendants want to paint it all white, more power to 'em i guess
1 Like   April 16, 2014 at 11:52AM
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PRO
Minnesota Cabinets, INC
Paint it white! If the upstairs is already white, they should match. Also, it's your home! If you resell it, it could add value to those who like white! White is very in right now. :)
1 Like   April 16, 2014 at 2:00PM
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Janice Robinson
Paint it! It's not like the oak gods are going to come after you!
1 Like   April 16, 2014 at 4:48PM
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Dorenda Clink
Everyone is always saying it will devalue your home, but think about the bulk of todays homebuyers...under forty, modern, chic, granite, luxury. No one is ever looking for stained or poly wood. I'm mid forties and when I sell my home I will not be looking for wood trim and I'll probably bypass any I have to paint myself. Wood is nice but its not todays contemporary look that us Youngins are looking for
0 Likes   April 20, 2014 at 9:17AM
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feeny
Folks, this post is almost two years old. I don't think advice is still needed for the OP, though others may want to discuss their own trim painting dilemmas.
0 Likes   April 20, 2014 at 9:23AM
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donnatoma
Paint it now! Enjoy the clean look of crisp, white wood trim!
0 Likes   April 20, 2014 at 9:26AM
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krispysoda
Buy a new house. If you don't like beautiful old wood please for the love of God buy a new house!
1 Like   August 29, 2014 at 7:55AM
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