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How can I improve the curb appeal of this house?
joaniek
November 14, 2012 in Design Dilemma
We are just purchasing this house and I am not happy with the lack of curb appeal. We can't repaint the whole exterior right now since it was recently painted and there are other things that need our money first, but I would be open to repainting the trim. I'd like to take out the shrubs but don't know what to replace them with. Wanted to paint the front door an accent color so it would stand out. Any other thoughts?
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PRO
Decorative Overlays
in one picture it looks gray in another it brown so what's the color and yes the shrubs need to go bye bye
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 9:04PM
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joaniek
It is a light taupe -- beige undertone
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 9:10PM
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Arlen Dau
I would keep the shrub, trim them down to half the current size. Either paint the door a dark color like burgundy or maybe black. Long range replace the door with a glass front. I think those down pipes should be moved/relocated as they are grabbing the focus of the house front. Buy a couple of nice entry mats for the front of the door and in front of the entry so visitors know the front - coordinate with the door color. Eventually replace the black hardware with a brass or copper. Relocate the house numbers to the stone column, also in a metal color to match the new hardware. Then, when a budget presents, consider some way to add dimension to the front - maybe awnings?
2 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 9:20PM
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PRO
Ross NW Watergardens
I agree with you that the current shrubs should go. They need to be replaces by the most dramatic plant that can fit in those planters. I don't know where you are located, so I am not sure what that is!
1 Like   November 14, 2012 at 9:25PM
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PRO
Decorative Overlays
My favorite thing to do is look at the stones and find a couple of colors that you really like! Use one color for the door and one for the trim and when looking for a new plant be sure to go to a local nursery with a picture of the area and find out the best fit and low maintenance for the area you live in.
2 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 9:38PM
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ehoyt2000
You may consider running the stonework all the way up the chimney. The door next to the garage is distracting, you could paint it the color of the house, or remove it altogether if you don't use it. I like house, lots of possibilities!
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 9:52PM
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joaniek
Yes, I love the idea of carrying the stonework up the chimney -- have to talk my husband into spending the money for that, however, he thinks the house looks just fine. LOL. The home is in San francisco (sunny zone) and the house faces south so gets lots of afternoon sun. Great idea to take a picture to the nursery for suggestions. And I like the idea of a colorful doormat too. There's a small ledge on either side of the door. Wondering if potted plants would work in there or not? Can't think what else to put on those ledges.
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:03PM
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joaniek
Would you leave the garage as is (square emphasized) or paint it all one color to make it blend more?
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:04PM
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jansgirl
I agree with removing the bushes. The space only needs something about 1/4 that large. I also agree with painting the ohter door the color of the garage door in an effort to make it 'go away" and be less confusing.
What about a terra cotta color for the door? You could dress up the "bench" on the right of the entry with pillows or potted plants.
Eventually I'd see about a different configuration for the down spouts.
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:11PM
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joaniek
ooh, pillows sound nice. I just wonder if they'd wander away overnight? Yeah, the downspouts are tricky because they go into the ground and need to enter a drain to take them away from the house. I think it's going to be a HUGE expense to change that but I'm going to ask some engineers for their advice -- the pipes drive me crazy!
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:23PM
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kah416
I love the shrub, it's pretty and adds to the cozy look of your house! I like the exterior! I think a couple pretty lanterns with candles set on your little bench would look beautiful! And an outdoor clock or large wreath hung on the wall above the bench would look great! You could even put a couple outdoor pillows on the bench during the summer for a little reading nook :)
Pottery Barn lanterns (you can get them at Pier 1 also)
A pretty welcome mat would be nice! http://www.pier1.com/Coir-Printed-Paisley-Doormat-Red/2633016,default,pd.html?cgid=outdoor_rugs http://www.pier1.com/Jacobean-Doormat/2614430,default,pd.html?cgid=outdoor_rugs
2 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:51PM
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kah416
Oh and as for the door, "Cottage Red" by Benjamin Moore would look lovely if you're going for a pop of color, or "Autumn Orange" by Benjamin Moore is pretty too.
2 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 10:57PM
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lc29
There may be setback issues, but I think trellises would look great above the upstairs windows and you could plant a vining type plant from the right planter to grow on them. Since your house is south facing that would also shade your windows a bit and gives depth to the front of your house. I like the autumn orange mentioned above since it's close to some of the stone in your facade, but the door to the right should be painted the same color as the rest of the house. Cute place!
1 Like   November 14, 2012 at 11:26PM
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joaniek
I can't envision the trellis over the windows -- do you have an image you could share of something similar? I like the idea, I just can't quite figure out what it would look like.
0 Likes   November 14, 2012 at 11:37PM
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pollyannagal
Nice house. Here is a VERY rough picture to suggest a solution to the downpipes. Adding some trim and re-routing the gutters to run into one downpipe at the side of the house. It would also add depth and highlight the entrance to the house more which is currently a bit lost as it is set so deep. This should not be too expensive as it won't involve digging up the drains which is what will cost you lots.

As a first step I would paint the walls inside the porch area white to lighten and define the entrance, paint the benches a darkish grey to tone with floor and paint the front door in a strong colour of your choice. Add something simple to the walls such as the clock suggested by kah416. Resist the temptation to put too much in this space. Pot plants could look a bit messy in there and probably wouldn't thrive but it is a lovely space to have occasional decorations that vary seasonally. Trim down the shrubs, and if that doesn't work replace them with something lower. Paint the door on the right so that it blends in more (I assume it isn't the main door) but leave the garage door as it is.
2 Likes   November 15, 2012 at 1:31AM
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victorianbungalowranch
I think a pergola mounted with brackets is what I think lc29 is talking about.. It is a little tight up there though. But I could definately see awnings on them ( mounted permanently) and a pergola mounted all accross the front above the door and garage, and a trellis in between the windows with a vine to help disguise the drainpipe.

I think this plus the suggested color changes would do a lot to tie the ground floor with the second floor and disguise some awkward areas. Pergolas can also be modern and made with cables stretched between brackets, and upstairs could be louvers angled to allow winter sun in and summer sun out.

Another thing that bothers me is that there is so much paving in front of the house and so little space for greenery. Trimming those bushes into a tree shape may be a possibility, plus the addition of climbing vines, and maybe enlarging the area around the roots a bit, or mixing in some water permeable pavers to help support the planting and soften the sea of concrete.

You will find all kinds of awnings and pergolas here: http://pinterest.com/rachael__anne/outside/

Capitol Hill
Surfers End
0 Likes   November 15, 2012 at 1:33AM
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lc29
Here's a couple of trellis/pergola styles I was thinking of, I had been looking at them because my next remodel will add a story directly above my garage and I think it would add interest above my garage door. In your case I think I would prefer above the windows though. [houzz=
1 Like   November 15, 2012 at 1:39AM
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pollyannagal
A further though on your shrubs - can't tell what they are from the photo but I would be inclined to trim them from the base up to lift them into more of a tree shape and then plant colourful trailing flowers below. This would retain the height and help disguise the downpipe and keep the interest above ground level. Height in a garden is good and often takes a long time to achieve. Be brave but take it bit by bit and keep standing back to check the shape as you go.
0 Likes   November 15, 2012 at 1:54AM
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lc29
Found a good closeup of one that would look good. [houzz=
]
0 Likes   November 15, 2012 at 1:58AM
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joaniek
Wow some great ideas here -- any thoughts about a porch light ? Would you add a door knocker?
0 Likes   November 15, 2012 at 8:02AM
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pollyannagal
Your porch is ideal for wall lanterns (black) but this would mean chasing in the wiring to change from what's there. Doesn't look like enough height for a more dramatic ceiling lantern - maybe a more contemporary flush fitting depending on your style. Does the doorbell work? If you want a vertical door knocker similar in size and shape to the handle could go above the letterbox.
0 Likes   November 15, 2012 at 8:19AM
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Beena
I would remove the large shrubs, plant a nice flowering vine and add planters with bright, colorful accents. Especially a trough planter in the alcove by the front door.
0 Likes   November 15, 2012 at 8:32AM
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joaniek
Really like that idea pollyanagal -- I might do some would moulding then to emphasize the peak?
0 Likes   November 15, 2012 at 8:08PM
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victorianbungalowranch
That might be nice, but I would be careful because you have virtually no roof overhang to protect anything. Perhaps just paint to give the illusion. And I wouldn't cover up those roof vents.

Like Polyanagel's idea to reroute downspouts and build small projection--shed roof, pergola, pent roof--to cover it up.

It looks like a townhouse--are there exterior changes limitations in your complex?
0 Likes   November 16, 2012 at 6:41AM
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apple_pie_order
Flowers in window boxes on the second floor would be lovely. Here's a gallery of photos: http://www.flowerwindowboxes.com/Window-Boxes-Gallery.html

I agree with trimming the big shrubs back. Take a cutting and a photo to the nursery and ask how to prune them correctly. Then you can plant lobelia, geraniums or other flowers that do well in San Francisco underneath. The shrubs will be very pretty with tiny white lights, too.
0 Likes   November 16, 2012 at 8:10AM
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joaniek
no, it's not a townhouse, it's a single family dwelling but SF homes are VERY close together -- we actually have no house abutting us on the right side since we are one in from the corner and the corner house faces the other street so it's their yard that hits our property line.
0 Likes   November 16, 2012 at 9:37AM
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designmuse
Paint doors a fun, bright color -- red, coral, turquoise, etc. The rest of the house is so neutral that anything would work. Get some fabulous,statement door knockers. I found mine on overstock. Get some big planters/urns (got mine at Ballards) and plant some pretty topiaries, ferns -- whatever you like. Trim back shrub -- definitely. Flower boxes are nice if you can manage the maintenance. Congrats!
0 Likes   November 16, 2012 at 7:34PM
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kaitlin3
First off, I would definitely paint the door a stand out color. Put shutters on the windows. Add flower boxes hanging from the windows too. Replace the shrubs with giant pots filled with fun colorful plants and flowers. In the area by the door, put outdoor cushions on the benches. Maybe make them yellow. Paint the door to the right tan, to match the house. Also, cut down the tree that is blocking sunlight from the stoop. If you want paint the stones white, that would look pretty. Overall, add color through accents and by flowers. Hope this help's and please reply!!!
0 Likes   November 16, 2012 at 8:00PM
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joaniek
thanks, I am definitely going to pain the side door to match the house and disappear -- still deciding on a color for the front door but don't think red is me -- maybe the amber color that is in the stone or a dark grey from the stone work-- I love the stone so won't paint over it but might extend it up the chimney. I love the idea of shutters too but will have to first figure out a way to reroute the drain pipes because they impede the ability to add shutters.
Think the front tree is on city property so we probably can't chop that down but would if I could.
I LOVE the idea that you and several others have mentioned re: putting cushions on the benches but our entryway is RIGHT off the sidewalk and I wonder if people would steal them -- am I just being paranoid?
0 Likes   November 16, 2012 at 8:11PM
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kaitlin3
You can add any color to the front door you would like. Just make it stand out. It would look really good if you extended the stone up to the chimney, it would add more character to the house. Have you ever though about a dark yellow door. Then you could match that with the cushions-though, I do not think someone would steel them, plenty of people have outdoor furniture that not stolen. Hope this helps!
kaitlin
0 Likes   November 16, 2012 at 8:20PM
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jagood
I think the two tall shrubs are covering up one of the most interesting features of your house - the stone pillars. If you can't prune them to be more open, revealing the stonework, perhaps it would be better to remove them, take a good photo, and go to a nursery that has good advice about plants that will look good right away and not grow too tall or take over again. I also think that once the stone pillars are revealed, it will help to take the focus off the downspounts on the upper floor, especially if you are able to replant with something attractive enough to draw the eye downward. Changing the plants, and painting the two doors will make a big difference and allow you to see what accents would be most appealing. The bench beside the front door is very functional - allowing a place to set down packages while opening the door. How nice that you have it!
0 Likes   November 16, 2012 at 9:11PM
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joaniek
Yes, definitely the shrubs have got to go - I had been thinking something with height but like your idea of drawing the eye downward and letting the stone be seen -- I'll keep that in mind. I'm new to the Bay area so have NO IDEA what will grow here so I'll be definitely heading to a local nursery.
0 Likes   November 16, 2012 at 10:48PM
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joaniek
Any thoughts on dwarf bougainvillea -- pro's or con's for the front?
0 Likes   November 16, 2012 at 10:57PM
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joaniek
curious as to why pots and not just planted in the ground as the shrubs are?
0 Likes   November 17, 2012 at 7:47AM
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pollyannagal
No need for a pot - your little raised bed where the shrubs are is all you need. A pot would look odd. We can't really grow these in London (too cold and wet) but we have recently been in Turkey and the hotel had lovely dwarf bougainvillea growing beside the paths which looked great but had little thorny bits on them that snagged our clothing as we walked past! Don't know if this was a specific variety but something to check for in terms of where you want to plant them.
0 Likes   November 17, 2012 at 7:57AM
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momsy
If I am correct, those bushes look like Nellie Stevens holly. They can be pruned back to a size that will complement the area. They definitely will need to be replaced eventually as they are too big a cultivar for this need. But if $$$$ are a concern, pruning is cheap and will allow you to spend money on other things for now.
0 Likes   November 17, 2012 at 8:07AM
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momsy
These could be fun.
0 Likes   November 17, 2012 at 8:10AM
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PRO
Monique Jacqueline Design
IC29 provided a fabulous photo of an arbor/pergula type overhang! Love this. I would remove your two shrubs and planters all together. I would get a couple of really neat pots, metal or casted cement and insert a tailored/groomed shrub with some shape detail. I would also consider the addition of awnings!
Hope this provided you with some ideas to ponder. As for a door color, I would keep the casing white and then paint only the doors themselves. A beautiful color would be Gentleman's gray by Benjamin Moore. It plays with the light and is beautiful. A bit out of the box from the burgundy and blacks. Also, you could incorporate your door color on the garage door as well!
http://www.google.com/search?q=benjamin+moore+gentleman's+gray&hl=en&client=tablet-android-toshiba&tbo=u&source=android-browser-suggest&v=141400000&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ei=L7mnUOTANcr3iwL0iIDoAQ&ved=0CD8QsAQ&biw=1280&bih=800

Cheers!
m.
0 Likes   November 17, 2012 at 8:20AM
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victorianbungalowranch
Your stonework looks something like the interesting "peanut brittle" style of mixed stone and brick (once popular for Arts and Crafts style houses) and probably would be hard to match and expensive to extend up the chimney, and might just make it look odd and blocky..

These stone walls, the front door and the lintels and upper windows of the house are your best features. The awkward shape of the house, the chimney, the odd door on the side, the downspouts and lack of of roof overhang are the least attractive parts of your house.

Rerouting the downspouts, painting out the odd door and installing the pergola with bougainvilla and digging out the shrubs or at least severely pruning them back would highlight the best features and conceal the worst, and bring balance to the facade. I would mount the pergola a little higher than usual so as not to obstruct the arches and to help conceal the new flatter slope of the downspouts, and consider puttng the house numbers above or on the garage door.

Window boxes would be great only if you are willing to water frequently--every other day or so. The ones pictured have trailing geraniums in them, which can be breathtaking. I would avoid shutters--wouldn't look right on such big windows.
0 Likes   November 25, 2012 at 3:22PM
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joaniek
Hmm, thanks for the info. on the stonework. I'll have to look into that. We've been trying to figure out what style this house is/was so we could build on that. I've been told that we may not be allowed to add a pergola (most likely can't) and I'm reluctant to add window boxes because they will be in an awkward place to service. But they would be pretty.
0 Likes   November 25, 2012 at 5:07PM
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lbigs
What a nice looking SF house! I would focus first on painting the front door a color that you love and finding a nice welcome mat. For planting suggestions, your nearest nursery would be able to suggest many plants that would work well. Or, look to see what your neighbors have in their yards to see what works well. Having grown up in the bay area, if you want to put pillows out, first buy some that are cheap but look nice to see if they will get taken. Personally, I would not put out anything that I wouldn't mind walking off.
0 Likes   November 25, 2012 at 6:07PM
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joaniek
Thanks, I've been warned that anything that is not nailed down will walk away (sad) so I'll have to give some careful thought to what goes on the bench.
0 Likes   November 25, 2012 at 6:10PM
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victorianbungalowranch
Too bad, what is the problem with the pergola? Do you have deed or HOA restrictions? If it is mounted on the house with brackets or hung with chains or cables, but not supported with posts, it should not infringe on the setback restrictions. If they won't go for the wall-mounted pergola, ask about about using brackets and cables for a trellis. If they won't go for that, ask about fabric awnings.

Also, you could probably mount flat or nearly flat trellis or cable all across the front and train a vine to climb over it. Not sure what kind would work there, but worth asking about at the nursery or garden center. Definately worth getting some good advice on since space is so limited and it would go a long way to help disguise the awkward downspouts..

Your house looks like it has an Arts and Crafts influence, but is of modern construction, and to me the lack of roof overhang and trim molding around the archways and top make it look not quite right--like something is missing. For the past 10-20 years or so, most new housing has been built in a "modern traditional eclectic" style which freely borrows from other periods but isn't really identifiable as a particular style. If it is older, it has been altered greatly.

Here are some rendering of what it might look like without the big bushes (in itself a big improvement) so you can see the nice stonework, and with a painted door (I think the aqua contrasts nicely with the body color, but of course other colors could work too) and a de-emphasized second door. Than I added a painted lintel to help unify and support the facade, and then added some painted "trim" to the gable and roofline and lintel, and added a scultpted boxwood to draw the eye toward the doorway and to help camoflage the gutter.

I would also consider perhaps making the garage door less contrasty by painting the trim a color similar to the painted lintel--sort of a lighter version of the stucco color. Generally the eye goes to the brightest color and the area of greatest contrast.

I lived in Germany for a long time and painted trim is common there to help disguise the boxiness of most of the buildings. It can look very nice, but of course requires care to do well on a bumpy surface.
0 Likes   November 25, 2012 at 11:10PM
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apple_pie_order
The house may be built with little or no setback from public sidewalk. San Francisco has restrictions on what can overhang public areas such as sidewalks because of the danger that overhanging structures will fall during an earthquake. Some historical overhanging signs are grandfathered in.

There are also pollution-related water runoff regulations that may affect how the storm drains were installed, consequently, how and where the gutters drain. It may be possible to add two more drains so that the gutters can drain straight down each side of the house.

It's worth the time to look into local building code. Talking to the people who issue building permits can be very helpful.
1 Like   November 26, 2012 at 5:55AM
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joaniek
yes, from what I've been told there are some strict regulations on altering the facade of any building here and our house is right on the street (not setback) so that will complicate things as well. But we will definitely explore all our options. Thanks victorianbungalowwranch for your photos showing what it could look like with changes to paint /shrubbery. I think I'd like to change the white trim to something either warmer or darker. But it's good to see how the look can change just with a bit of paint!
0 Likes   November 26, 2012 at 7:57AM
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joaniek
The house was built in 1938 -- it has a bit of the art moderne feel in the sense that it was a one-floor home built over a garage (very popular then) but those generally had flat roof and curved corners. Our home has a flat roof over the garage and then a bit of a peak on the left side and the stone pillars. It seems to be a bit of a hybrid or it maybe that it's just been altered over the years.

There was an addition added in the back to create a second floor master bedroom suite (slightly altering the original layout of the home) and the street level storage behind and floor below that have been "finished" to add to the living space of the home which is a change from the original structure which most likely would have just had that as unfinished storage space.

Anyway, I think eclectic is the best way to describe it.
0 Likes   November 26, 2012 at 8:03AM
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victorianbungalowranch
The proposed pergola or cable trellis could stick out no further than the planter, which I assume is still on her property. If could be as narrow as just beyound the downspouts--maybe a 6-8 inch projection from the wall at most. I saw this done all the time in Europe, but of course they don't have as many earthquakes.:) Cables can be strong enough to support the weight of a grapevine over the street.

I don't think it is worth adding more downspouts--would have to tear up the paving to do that to hook into the storm sewer system. I do think it would be worthwhile to flatten out the angle to make it less noticable, or do something like what Pollyannagal suggested.

A trellis could itself add some dimension and interest, even without a vine on it. They can be quite architectural. I think paint and a trellis, perhaps bridging the entire front of the house, are her best options in such a limited space. Maybe a bit of caste iron like ornament is a possibility too. Anything mounted onto the wall should be separated by an air gap to prevent moisture buildup.
http://pinterest.com/1organicgardens/arbors-trellises/
http://pinterest.com/search/?q=trellis
http://www.ehow.com/how_7770848_attach-trellis-stucco-wall.html
http://www.sunset.com/garden/waires-wall-espalier-00400000039538/

I saw a reference to evergreen creaping fig as a possible plant. It needs to be something really hardy.

Here is a guide to getting permits in San Francisco. It does not specifically mention trellises, but has phone numbers you can call about it. You also need a permit for scaffolding that impinges on the sidewalk. Normally a building permit isn't required for such things, but it doesn't hurt to check, especially in an urban area
0 Likes   November 26, 2012 at 8:42AM
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mollesmart
I recall a home with the same color on my block that was purchased, and a curb appeal makeover was done and one thing that stands out was the door. They painted it a rich laquor red and had a couple of planters on the side with tall topiary in rustic pots. It looked charming.
0 Likes   November 26, 2012 at 9:59AM
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victorianbungalowranch
Oops, here's the reference for getting building permits: http://www.sfdbi.org/ftp/uploadedfiles/dbi/Key_Information/19GettingCityPermitWeb1006.pdf

It doesn't look Art Moderne to me--maybe a bit of Mission influence judging from the pipes in the gable and the doors and the lintels. Maybe you could play up the Spanish Mission type thing with some iron railings and ornament.

I saw the most amazing stuff done to just plain flat stucco in Germany--all kinds of murals, Tromp d'oile, lots fo simple painted on trim, quoins, panels, window frames ect.. Should have taken more pictures of the ordinary buildings while I was there. Even new buildings have this in simplified form. Probably would be pricey to get a specialist, but might be worth considering.

If you can find an old photo of the building, perhaps from a previous owner, it would give you a clue, but it could have been very utilitarian. When an older building looks tidy but a little off, it is usually because something is missing. Buildings tend to lose trim and detail and get flatter over time. Perhaps there are some similar buildings nearby.

Do you have wood frame or vinyl windows? Vinyl windows shouldn't be painted--probably not the best for aluminum either. I think darker trim could look nice, but the top is already looking a bit heavy. I would take some new pictures without the car in the way and fewer shadows and try using a online paint program, such as by Sherwin Williams. It is tedious to create the masks (they have some directions) but worth it so you can experiment with color combinations. Various shades of green, especially light Jadeite type colors, and park bench dark blue green, might look nice too.

If you paint the frames, I would consider installing thicker facia trim in a darker color too. Thicker facia alone might help quite a bit for the roofline. Perhaps it would be a good idea to consult a professional for some advice once you played around with some ideas. I Googled and can see there are a lot of houses like this in the Bay area, although the stone trim seems fairly unusual, and most had shaped rooflines.The last photo is very plain, but I like what they did with the chimney.

Perhaps take a deep breath and cut down or prune those bushes after the holidays. And you have all winter to plan on what to do with the facade.

I used to advise an architectural review board, and they are generally favorable of modest changes-- paint, a pergola, trellis or awnings can improve just about any building that looks out of balance. They are generally considered removable too and not permanent structural changes. Of course, San Francisco is probably pretty strict compared to the MidWest..
0 Likes   November 26, 2012 at 10:25AM
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joaniek
thanks for the link -- yes, in some ways it has some of the mission features, but not really. I think it's just a mix of styles. Thanks for all the ideas. We still haven't even moved in yet, (next month) but it's good to get thinking now so I'll be ready to go in the spring.
0 Likes   November 26, 2012 at 10:31AM
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victorianbungalowranch
Well most American buildings are a mix of some sort. Happy moving--I've done it before just before Christmas and it isn't easy.
0 Likes   November 26, 2012 at 10:48AM
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victorianbungalowranch
Wow, saw your house in this article. Isn't it nice to get picked for professional color help:
0 Likes   November 28, 2012 at 11:34PM
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joaniek
yes, victorianbungalowranch -- I was very surprised. We close on the house tomorrow -- getting very excited!
0 Likes   December 6, 2012 at 8:20PM
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joaniek
It's been awhile but today we finally took the first step on improving the front exterior of our home. We had the shrubs pulled out. Here's what it looks like now:'
0 Likes   September 30, 2013 at 2:14PM
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victorianbungalowranch
Looks better already!
0 Likes   September 30, 2013 at 2:34PM
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joaniek
thanks -- we have a LONG way to go, but it is exciting to at least be getting started!
0 Likes   September 30, 2013 at 3:56PM
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momsy
Oh my goodness....what an improvement! The color is lovely and brings out the stone nicely.
0 Likes   September 30, 2013 at 4:06PM
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