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Floor tile in 1920's kitchen?
rsaund
November 29, 2012 in Design Dilemma
We want tile in the kitchen and family room rather than hardwood because we want to put in-floor heating and feel tile is a much better medium. However, we're struggling with the idea of doing tile vs. hardwood, because we don't want to mess with the integrity of the period (built in 1929) and there is existing ORIGINAL tile in entryway and sunroom that we don't want conflict with - see pix. The rest of the main level is (or will be) hardwood. Is there a tile style that will be true to the period and NOT conflict with existing tile? I prefer the look of hardwood in the kitchen and family room, but definitely want warm floors.
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rsaund
Addendum: This is home as exists now - just purchased. Many renovations planned but we will keep this original tile.
November 29, 2012 at 4:47PM   
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Paige Paul
Have you considered engineered hardwood floors (not laminate)? They work better than solid hardwood in climates with varying seasonal temperatures and it is my understanding that they work well with floor heating. You could get the look and warmth you want without having to match/complement the great original tiles.
November 29, 2012 at 5:42PM     
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judianna20
I have radiant heat under my hardwood floors (2009). There is no reason not to have the floors you want.
November 29, 2012 at 5:56PM   
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PRO
Adelene Keeler Smith Interior Design
Hi rsaund:

A great house!

Whether you settle on wood or tile floors for kitchen and family room - depending upon the room layouts... you can respect the original entrance foyers and sunroom by adding a similar contrasting band/pattern to new floor applications which will serve to unite the old with the new.

BTW, the foyer light fixture, staircase, and two entrance doors (curved + french) are just stunning! Don't you just love older homes and the craftsmanship they often possess - a lost art... I fear.

I would love to see other rooms (and architectural elements of your home) - The living room to the right looks intriguing. Are those pocket doors on the left?

Best, Addie
November 29, 2012 at 6:48PM   
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rsaund
Addie I have lots of pix but new to houzz and not sure correct place or protocol to post them all, so guidance is appreciated then I will post away;) also don't know if it makes a diff but we're in MN and pretty extreme temp fluctuation. Haven't yet met with contractor for advice, but most web resources I'm finding caution about radiant heat with hardwood. If others in similar climate have diff experiences would love to hear. Thanks!
November 29, 2012 at 6:57PM   
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rsaund
Paulpa, thanks! Afraid of engineered hardwood since there is other original wood on adjacent areas. Fear it would be hard to match, but I'm honestly unfamiliar with the product. Gonna google it now.
November 29, 2012 at 7:00PM   
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rsaund
Ok I put a bunch of photos of the house as purchased (has previous owner's furniture in it) - this is our remodeling project. If this isn't the proper place to post these, let me know and I'll move them:
November 29, 2012 at 7:25PM     
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rsaund
Ok I put a bunch of photos of the house as purchased (has previous owner's furniture in it) - this is our remodeling project. If this isn't the proper place to post these, let me know and I'll move them:
November 29, 2012 at 7:25PM     
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PRO
Weaver Home Photography
Amazing home! Please post during and after pictures throughout your projects!
November 29, 2012 at 8:48PM   
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yvonnecmartin
Have you checked if you can tile similar to that in the entryway? You might need to go to a specialty tile store, but your house is worth it.
November 29, 2012 at 9:23PM   
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Bobbi Seck
I'm sure you can recreate that tile pattern throughout your home. If not, basket weave tile patterns are true to the era.
November 29, 2012 at 9:29PM   
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suzie123
i think you could you use amazing tile in a style that is true to the house and time period and does not clash with the hall. I have seen this done in a friend's house that is over 100 years old and it is the best kitchen floor i have ever seen.have fun renovating this beautiful home!
November 29, 2012 at 11:00PM   
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apple_pie_order
Gorgeous house! If you are renovating the whole house, I suggest you collect ideas here and hire an interior designer.
November 30, 2012 at 6:24AM     
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rsaund
Definitely hiring a designer - interviewing my 2nd this morning. Trying to decide about independent designer + contractor, vs. a design/build firm. Interviewing both and weighing pros and cons. Maybe the design/build for the kitchen PLUS independent designer to help with other aspects (furniture, drapes, etc..) I will know more later - just started the process.
November 30, 2012 at 6:52AM   
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groveraxle
Awesome house. You might look into those floor tiles that look like wood. They seem to get rave reviews.

November 30, 2012 at 7:33AM   
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lessismoore
There are tons of photos on the internet of tile design used in 20s period houses, but more focused on baths. What I saw was several uses of hexagonal tiles (of course much larger than the wee white ones in baths of that era http://hookedonhouses.net/2011/02/09/sheryl-crows-romantic-1920s-hollywood-estate/)

and in general, more spanish/moorish designs. The moorish tile is gorgeous, but a real "commitment," However, used with a lighter hand (say only in a border) could look fabulous - within the pattern




Your house is incredible - from the front, it looks more "federalist" (with the twin chimneys and gables, rather than mediterranean ... but with the wrought iron and arches ...
November 30, 2012 at 9:03AM     
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lessismoore
one more here ...with nice examples of the basket weave pattern:

November 30, 2012 at 9:08AM   
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PRO
Adelene Keeler Smith Interior Design
Hi rsaund:

Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! (my soul is soaring) for sharing and sending additional pictures of your new "beyond extraordinary" home!!! It is truly an architectural treasure and appears to be well taken care of by previous owners. Many Congratulations! I do wish to offer some idea's on how you might proceed with your renovation/interior design process... but it would get far too lengthy here in comment box. Might you e-mail me directly at tsquare7@earthlink.net or call at 561.626.4012.

Best, Addie Smith
Palm Beach, Florida
November 30, 2012 at 10:18AM   
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victorianbungalowranch
That ivy can wreck havoc with the masonry and I would take it down.

Arts and Crafts Homes. com is a good source for period materials. The floors in the kitchen do not have to match the entry exactly, and often did not. Of course linoleum was newly popular then, and unglazed porcelian ceramic tile in hexagon and penny rounds were still used then. They cover period revivals and colonials too. Old House Journal and This Old House are good sources too.

The tile pattern you have in the entry is very classic and is still in use--you can even get mosaic tile in that pattern. I would get porcelian tiles with high slip resistance--skip the shiny stuff--and in a color/colors that don't show the dirt. Even slate might be OK--not strictly period, but in that spirit. If you post pics of the kitchen or what you plan to do with it, then that would help. Here are some pics of high-style period kitchens.

Antique Home Style .com is also a great resource with original planbooks and illustrations of some period interiors and floor plans. That is where I got these illustrations. If you do an image search with certain keywords, you can find some good info. PinInterest has some good period pictures, as does Flicker, but you can't copy those. You can Pin them though.
November 30, 2012 at 1:43PM     
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victorianbungalowranch
Here's some other 20s kitchens and a modern interpretation. Notice that they are unfitted or has limited cabinets--that was typical then. Bungalow Kitchens (the book) can be a great resource for a period home--the kitchens in a Colonial was pretty similar to one in a Bungalow--a bit bigger perhaps, maybe some "Colonial" wallpaper, althought that is really a 30s-40s thing. There was a huge surge of popularity about that time due to the 150th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, and a shift toward tradition. Kitchens were very much utilitarian spaces though for most people--largely white and plain.

A Christmas Story has a perfect period kitchen--straight from the 20s except for the stove. Not that you want your kitchen that way, but incorporating an Elmira stove (woodstove type) or an Agra (if you can afford the cost and weight) and a Hoosier cabinet or a 20's style china cabinet with flat fretwork, or a massive wall sized oven vent, it could be pretty cool. Can you post pictures of the kitchen and hall?

I have an idea book on PreWar kitchens with more pictures.
December 1, 2012 at 12:14PM   
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lessismoore
victorian ... - she has a whole "idea book" with a kitchen pix here:
December 1, 2012 at 12:42PM   
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houssaon
I would agree that the tile is very arts and crafts. Knowing this you should be able to home in on manufacturers who specialize in this period of tile.

Yes, the ivy should go. What a grand home. I am so glad that you appreciate the period pieces. It is a bit of our history. Good luck!
December 1, 2012 at 1:22PM   
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victorianbungalowranch
Wow, that house is even bigger and grander than I thought. Wat a beautiful leaded glass window.

Anyway, It looks like she is going for a traditional white kitchen--sort of that Edwardian butler's pantry look. She asked about authentic 20s floor tile, so that's what the pics are for.

I think tsaund doesn't have to go totally authentic in the kitchen, and a variety of options would look nice with classic white cabinets. I also thought the pics had some neat stuff (take a look at that colbalt sink!) that could inspire a modern version. And it is kind of fun to know what the original might have been. Probably had servants and was very utilitarian.

Why anyone would put carpet in a kitchen is beyond me. I know they did that in the 70s, but why? Maybe they didn't cook much or were worried about falls.

Saw this and it reminded me of this house and the entry. Has a white kitchen too.

Admiral's House
Project: Admiral's House
December 1, 2012 at 1:41PM   
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cadde53
Every few months I use a stone cleaner that you can purchase that is mixed with water, if you have soap marks on your shower you can put less water in the mixture , spray it on your stone, leave it for a few minutes and use a NYLON scrubber to scrub it off. http://www.ozgedus.com/tr/ If you have porcelain/ceramic tile you can still seal the entire tile/grout lines, grout is a porous material ,this helps with keeping your grout clean. This is important in your shower.
December 1, 2012 at 4:39PM   
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dottijones
Very nice we are renovating our kitchen that still has a good amount of tile from the 1920's......trying to save each tile for those who want them
April 13, 2013 at 8:00AM   
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