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moving a chandelier over by a foot or so by using strong hook in ceiling joist?
jwpookie
December 27, 2012
I have the idea of making my kitchen an eat-in kitch. To do that, I would be losing my almost never used dining room. I removed a leaf from the long table and it will fit nicely in the kitchen. I plan on putting four cozy chairs around a big round ottoman/coffee table in the former DR. One big issue...There is a chandelier in the kitchen on the pitched ceiling and it is not where it would need to be if I put the DR table there. Would it look terrible to use a strong or heavy duty hook of some sort, put into the ceiling joist and move the chain of the chandelier over to it? Also, I would be losing some of the length of the chain so the height of the light might be too high. Or will I have to have it rehung in the right place and then paint the ceiling of the whole kitchen, DR and LR as they are all pretty much open to each other? Any ideas would help. I have attached a couple of pics of the room without the DR table in it yet.
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orangecamera
You can certainly move it with the hook. If the chain is too short, check to see if there's extra wire up inside the canopy (the metal part where the chandelier meets the ceiling). Sometimes an electrician will leave the wire extra long, for precisely the reason you want it. If there's no extra wire, most lighting stores can rewire it for you. It shouldn't cost much, but you'd have to reconnect it.
    Bookmark   December 27, 2012 at 6:13PM
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jwpookie
Great, thank you.
    Bookmark   December 27, 2012 at 6:16PM
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PRO
Studio Homes
actually i think thats a great idea! i have actually seen lighting done like that before....i think mostly exterior lantern styles but nothing wrong with what you are trying. however expect not to catch a rafter/truss as when places are wired electricians usually aim to not hit one...cause then there isnt enough depth for the device box. there is a slim chance they ran into one though and either notched the truss or used a "pancake" box. you may even find it is up against a truss so that you just have to attach your hook 2 or 3 inches to the side. just grab a stud sensor before you get too excited...there may even be strapping there to bite into. but most importantly.... do not attempt unless you find wood! a drywall plug will not hold the weight for long! best of luck :)
    Bookmark   December 27, 2012 at 6:41PM
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PRO
Linda
I have seen that done quite often. If there is some extra wire in the ceiling but not enough chain, go to a lighting store or hardware store and buy a length of chain. Just use pliers to bend one link on the existing chain and one length on the new chain and splice it in, then squeeze back together with the pliers. Don't worry about scratching the finish on the chain since it will be several feet over your head.

If you don't have enough wire, it's a simple matter to change it out. Shut off your breaker then remove the fixture by loosening the nut just below the round ceiling plate. Then the round piece with the loop at the end of the chain will come off the bracket in the ceiling. Undo the tape and wire nuts of the original wiring and take the fixture down. Now you can buy new cord and reconnect the wire from the inside of the fixture to the ceiling.

If you have a Habitat for Humanity Restore near you, it might be cheaper to buy a fixture with the right length of wire and chain than to redo the one you already have. We once had a customer buy a light fixture, remove the brass chain and immediately redonate the fixture itself
    Bookmark   December 27, 2012 at 6:49PM
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PRO
Cynthia Taylor-Luce
While you can swag the light over to where you want it, the ideal solution is to have it re-wired. This will add expense and you may not want to do it. Swagging the light is a compromise in this case.
    Bookmark   December 27, 2012 at 10:08PM
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jwpookie
I have access to the trusses or joists through my attic so I can easily check that out. I am not comfortable with wiring but I will try the swag idea and if it doesn't look right, I will hire an electrician to move it over to where I want it...I wish I had Chico(Candice Olsen's electrician from HGTV) he works his electrician magic and then repairs the drywall and paints it too. If I do have to have it moved, I will by a new one as I am not too fond of the builder's standard that is already there.
Thank you all for the wonderful advice,
1 Like    Bookmark   December 28, 2012 at 12:02PM
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