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Is it crazy expensive to put windows in kitchen??
drpeggio
February 6, 2013 in Design Dilemma
HELP! Can't agree with husband on new kitchen design. We have a window in our kitchen which we both would like to keep. However, new kitchen design requires getting rid of window so that we can move new 36" range into that space (not exactly unfortunately). Alternative would be putting 30"range on same wall as fridge (obviously not my pref). Would it be prohibitively expensive to put range in new space (approx where window is now) and put a small window on both sides of range?? Thanks!
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Sharon Lewis
Moving the gas for the range is expensive. I would try to save as much natural light as possible. Can you keep the new range where the current range is?
February 6, 2013 at 8:35am   
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drpeggio
Thank you for weighing in. The prob is we're knocking out a wall to make a more open space. Doing away with island which is where the range is. Need to put the range on one of those two walls, either the fridge wall or the window wall.
February 6, 2013 at 8:42am   
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PRO
Fenstermann LLC-Newport Beach
Hi, congrats on the new kitchen!

To answer your question, no. The windows themselves would be very small, and depending on where you buy them could cost $170-250 for vinyl. However, I agree with Sharon, more light is better!
February 6, 2013 at 9:42am   
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PRO
Interiors International, Inc.
Sure that would work. If the hubby is handy it really isn't that hard to do.
February 6, 2013 at 9:45am   
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lmckni2
why get rid of the island? i wouldn't think that would open up things very much. how about a smaller island with a stove top? kitchen space is more important than an open space. just my opinion :) also, lighter cabinets would make the space look more open.
February 6, 2013 at 9:48am   
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PRO
mimibrunner
Consider leaving the window in front of the new range location, and using an island-type range hood and an induction range or cooktop (no open flame, better performance than gas). You could add additional windows on either side for a wonderful effect.. There are a number of examples on Houzz, and I think it makes cooking much more enjoyable. And it is certainly easy to clean spatters on glass--no different really than tile.
February 6, 2013 at 10:01am   
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PRO
Fenstermann LLC-Newport Beach
I think you would have a hard time with that. Everything will show up on glass, and you will have to lean over your stove to clean it! It might look good, but I don't see it as the most functional option.
February 6, 2013 at 10:07am   
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drpeggio
Thank you all for your imput! Fenstie-what do you think of putting a window on either side of the range? I wasn't planning to put the window behind the range. Want a groovy hood! So you don't think it would be all that costly?? Thanks so much!
February 6, 2013 at 1:00pm   
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orangecamera
The window itself might not cost much, but don't forget you need to fill in the space from the old window, and cut holes for the new ones. Cutting a hole shouldn't be too bad (as long as there isn't something important running inside the wall now). But closing up the old one could be expensive depending on what type of siding is on your house, and if you have to re-side the entire wall (outside) to make it look nice.

If you put your stove where your current sink is, where will the new sink and dishwasher go?
February 6, 2013 at 1:07pm     
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apple_pie_order
Local building codes will indicate how close windows can be to a range or cooktop. Don't get your heart set on something that you won't be allowed to build for safety's sake.

I suggest you consider keeping the island with a new slide-in range and using a very nice hood/vent over it.
February 6, 2013 at 1:28pm   
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PRO
Fenstermann LLC-Newport Beach
I think putting windows on either side of the range would be a good idea. Just as long as you understand that you are not going to have as much cabinet space. I think 10-12" wide for each window is the minimum you should use. Remember, when you do this to place the cabinets about 8-12 inches away from the windows. Since you are going to take the island out, storage might be an issue. If you bring the cabinets in closer, than you will block the light into the room from either side. You might think about having the windows just above the counter, and up to the ceiling to maximize their affect. In the picture, you have the lights on during the day, this may be because you want lighting for the picture. But, it may be because you don't have enought light in the room already.

I agree with Orange as well. If this is a DIY project, be sure to locate all wiring and pipes before you remove the framing for the new windows.
February 6, 2013 at 1:32pm   
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drpeggio
Orangecamera-we are planning to move the sink and dishwasher to a peninsula with raised bar (perpendicular to wall with sink on it now). We will be giving up some cabinet space, but I'm hoping we can manage. Thanks for asking and making some great suggestions!
February 7, 2013 at 11:47am   
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Judy M
I'm thinking approx $500 per window. $250 for the window and $250 to install each. Plus the cost to remove and close up window that you need to take out. Get and estimate from whoever is doing the kitchen remodel.
February 7, 2013 at 11:53am   
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orangecamera
drgeggio, sounds like you have a plan! :) I gave up some cabinet space when I moved. I've mostly been able to adjust, especially by getting rid of a lot of things I didn't really need. I also went from having a microwave on the counter to one over the range..that's a huge space-saver. So far the only thing I haven't found a home for is my wok, it's big!
February 7, 2013 at 12:00pm   
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PRO
Ironwood Builders
A big don't forget is the need for a structural header on an exterior load bearing wall. A mini beam supported by short studs (cripples or trimmers) that keeps the floor or roof above from crushing the window...and other precious things like your noggin.
February 7, 2013 at 12:03pm     
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