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Advice on Hallway Floor Tile
Stone & Land, LLC
February 11, 2013 in Design Dilemma
I was starting some remodeling and taking up the sheet of linoleum and found this wonderful old linoleum tile underneath. I want to keep it because of its je ne sais quoi. It’s also easy on the budget if you know what I mean. Less than 2 hours of my labor to take off the shoe molding and pull this stuff up. Is there a good product to get some of the old adhesive off the surface? Feel free to suggest something else if you don't feel the vibe.
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ASVInteriors
Hmmm - This reminds me of my old school corridors! If your house were more industrial chic, this would be bang on trend, but the walls and decor don't look much like that. Unless you were going to go all out and change everything to incorporate this into your design, I cannot imagine it working successfully.
It's sad but I feel it is just in the wrong place in the wrong decade!

What else do you have in your house? Would parquet work down the hallway matching the wood trim? I must admit to liking the light colour of the original lino - not the design...)
3 Likes   February 11, 2013 at 1:07PM
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wmpj
I agree with ASVInteriors.
0 Likes   February 11, 2013 at 1:11PM
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Stone & Land, LLC
Well I got into the kitchen and had some more of the same, except green field and a white border Some of it popped off when I pulled up the sheet stuff. Now if I put back the ones that popped, kept it all similar, I'd be in like Flynn. The bedrooms are hardwood and the decor will probably stay country but try to update a little to country chic. It was built in 1949.
0 Likes   February 11, 2013 at 2:28PM
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olldroo
Daniel, there is lino and there is lino, but that one is really nice. I am trending back to lino a bit simply because it is so easy to maintain, a quick run over with a steam mop, plus it is soft underfoot and much quieter than timber floors.

However, I do agree with ASV that it looks wrong with everything else, so how to fix??? I'm wondering about a stronger colour paint on the walls, like the dark colour in the lino but the timber architraves and skirting don't go. I can't look at any colours are your's are totally different to mine but I feel anything like that wouldn't look "country", in fact the lino isn't quite country either, and I have a feeling the owners probably would like to keep their country look.

The other product I am thinking purely thinking of the noise factor, would be cork tiles. Amazing range of colours in them. Cancork is one supplier who advertises on this website.

There would be products around to dissolve glue, but I'm wondering if turps might work. Just test carefully as it could take the colour out of the lino.
1 Like   February 11, 2013 at 8:13PM
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Stone & Land, LLC
Thanks for the tips olldroo. The paint suggestion just sparked something. I don't know if you can see next to the bathroom door on the left there was a wall phone. You can kind of see the old paint color. It looks pretty similar to the green tile color, a little more minty maybe. That would tie into the complementary color scheme, pretty bold, but darker. That minty color might have been the trend in the 1950's
0 Likes   February 12, 2013 at 7:48AM
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Stone & Land, LLC
Well jacqui87, I still have the phone but I don't know if it goes with the 50's theme I think I want to go with. It was more like a 1970's model. Most people don't have a land line nowadays. Here is the picture of the kitchen tile. See that green tile. I think it'll build on the theme, save a bunch of money. If I don't get it, let me know what I should do.
0 Likes   February 12, 2013 at 11:07AM
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olldroo
Daniel, everything came up in shades of apricots and brown on my screen, I didn't realise any green was there but that is good because now the timber won't be a problem. Talking green to me may not be that good a thing - it is my favourite colour so I am very biased. I have even just painted my bedroom green and am using as much white as possible to keep the room really fresh!!!

A mid range green could come up good in the hallway and there are some nice greens now that have a brownish undertone, but still look fresh and any artwork would really pop. Suggestion - grab a couple of sample pots and paint the little return walls in hallway. When you put your shoes back on, you will be able to look down the hall for a fairly good idea of the effect.

From the kitchen photo you could be getting into an olive green which was a 70s thing to go with the phone (lol) but there are some really nice shades now around the olive colour that are just a bit fresher and not as drab. I think with the natural timber and lots of white you could end up with a really clean look.
0 Likes   February 12, 2013 at 4:11PM
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olldroo
You've definitely got the 70s colours right Jacqui, but like most people I firmly believe they should stay right back there in the 70s. The avocado/olives are back but much cleaner and fresher, orange was also used but today's oranges are also softer and cleaner, coral is another option and the gold can be replaced by a custard yellow shade - more a soft gold. All these combined give a lovely clean look that is updated 70s, even an aqua blue can be mixed for some extra colour. I think Daniel is going for a 50s look too which would be more sickly pastel shades so these colours bring both eras together.
1 Like   February 12, 2013 at 5:09PM
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Stone & Land, LLC
Thanks, yeah that black color is old style mastic. Funny the green tile seems to pop off easy and the red and white tiles hang on tight. I went ahead and ripped up the stuff because I couldn't see going back to the old color scheme with the kitchen look I was going for. It took me most of the evening to finish the hallway. I had to really chip away at the red tile and that tough adhesive pulled up a little bit of the plywood too, so I'll have to do some prep before the new floor. Maybe I'll contract that out, get a warranty from the installer / supplier. Here's the somewhat blank slate. I'll finish ripping up the kitchen tile tomorrow.
0 Likes   February 12, 2013 at 9:22PM
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Terri Symington, ASID
I think you would achieve an updated look to the space by painting out the wood trim with a semi-gloss or satin trim paint, to match the walls and ceiling color.

In the photo below you can see where I kept the trim the same color as the walls.
3 Likes   February 12, 2013 at 9:43PM
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yvesun
cork.
0 Likes   February 12, 2013 at 10:06PM
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Stone & Land, LLC
Oooh, I like Terri! We had a sconce down by the kitchen entrance. Not as pretty as those. I do like that fresher feeling. I'm not sure I have the guts to paint over the trim and doors; there is so much of it around the house. I know painting it one of the easiest low cost ways of changing the look. I'm going to sleep on it, see what tomorrow brings.

I think I'm leaning to a little more country / rustic and I am keeping to a budget. I've got a picture of one of the bedrooms nicely decorated that shows pretty well, has something to build off of. I might change out / remove the wall paper border, but I have more pressing concerns.

I'm so sorry; I think I forgot to tell everyone that this house is on a farm property therefore the main reason of trying to stick to the vernacular. It'll be hard to change out so many of the furnishings already there.
0 Likes   February 12, 2013 at 10:11PM
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Stone & Land, LLC
How easy is cork to take care of, I haven't really looked into it. I think I've just thought it'd trap dust or dirt ( my uneducated impression thinking of a cork tack board ) Is it ok if you have dogs?
0 Likes   February 12, 2013 at 10:25PM
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olldroo
Why is it everyone wants to paint timber. There is next to no maintenance with timber architraves and skirting, paint it and you paint forever plus you have to specially treat it to ensure the timber doesn't bleed through the paint. Even the furniture in the bedroom seems to match it.

Terri's photo is absolutely beautiful and very classy but it isn't country.

If you really want to get that country/farmhouse theme going, then it is lots of patterns, overstuffed chairs, throws and plump cushions. Old and mismatched furniture goes well too. In your bedroom here, patchwork quilts are a must too. I will try to find photos for you.

[houzz=
]
1 Like   February 12, 2013 at 10:31PM
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september_morn
Actually... That is a country home on several hundred acres with cattle and horses. Your idea of country is very out dated. Today's country is fresh. And the reason to paint the wood is because it looks better. The wood gives a very dated look, especially when the trim is narrow.
0 Likes   February 12, 2013 at 10:42PM
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olldroo
Daniel, not much difference between cork and lino as far as wearing goes, the cork is all sealed, but you do need to refinish it every few years, depending on traffic. When cork has been mentioned before on here I have questioned the wearing of it as heel marks (as in high narrow heels) show and anything sharped drop can cut it. However Cancork Flooring who have a site here, assure me that it is all self healing. Check out their page and their website, there is a lot of information on it.
0 Likes   February 12, 2013 at 10:48PM
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Stone & Land, LLC
I can see from your ideabooks september_morn what you mean, but for this house I'll really have to think long and hard about doing the trim and everything white, I even see it in olldroo's picture but I tend to agree with her about keeping wood wood. The doors are very nicly grained and I really don't want to change them out. Here is the only other presentable room (everything else is too cluttered with extra stuff moved around), which will be the master. I'm thinking about taking out a laundry room on the back porch to enlarge on suite bathroom. Sorry, getting ahead of myself, a little off topic.
0 Likes   February 12, 2013 at 11:13PM
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intoit
I think you farmhouse is lovely and has lots of character. The bedrooms look great and I'm sure your hall and kitchen will be comfortable as well as practical. I live on a working farm and know how messy farm life gets. Don't paint the wood or put in cork floors as the maintence is too much. Many people like a homey feel to a house and although the designer look appeals to many it is not always right for farm living. Best of luck with your renovation and you are wise to stay in your budget and still get the home you like.
2 Likes   February 13, 2013 at 5:54AM
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Terri Symington, ASID
Hello Stone and Land, I know you are reluctant to paint out the wood trim, but for others who confuse the idea of an up dated fresh farm house interior with that of looking too "designer-y" and not homey enough...I am showing these following photos from "Country Living" 2008.
This interior is not short on feeling "homey" and color accents can be added easily.

The comment about the maintenance is one that should be of little issue. Painted trim done in a good quality paint is easy to maintain.

In regards to the cork... there are different types and qualities... and unless you know what you are dealing with, it is best to avoid using it. Cork floors can be very durable. There are public libraries that have the same cork floors for several decades... but they used the traditional method of using the cork tile that is glued down. It can even be refinished like a wood floor with a sanding and staining and sealing... after all... it is a wood product. But the cork flooring that is typical today is the click together floating floor and it does not have a durable surface. It will scratch and tear easily.
0 Likes   February 13, 2013 at 8:33AM
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Stone & Land, LLC
Thanks Terri again, It looks so nice. Maybe I can change it up in the kitchen where there isn't that nicer wood trim. I'm openening it up more to the "sun room" on the east side of the house. I guess I could paint / whitewash the existing cabinets to get the effect you have shown. The sunroom was added in the late 70's or early 80's and the Anderson window are still OK. I am going to close off the existing door and the window for more counter space, cabinets, and relocating the fridge in the corner near the hallway. Just got done with removing the kitchen tiles. Here are some more pictures to give you a better idea of what's been done and what I have to work with. Its still a pretty small kitchen so I'm not too concerned with moving the fridge, I hope actually spreads out the prep space a little and I don't plan on having any island to get in the way. I'll probably pair that space along that south wall with a microwave and toaster. Where the fridge used to be I was planning on a nice large pantry. We're making a "bar" above the sink, installed a beam for unobstructed open feeling into the east "sun room". We've also widened the entry from the hallway to the kitchen to about 6.5' so it seems a lot bigger. Here are the before pictures, and one where we've removed a cabinet.
0 Likes   February 13, 2013 at 11:08AM
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Stone & Land, LLC
Here's where we're at now, and a picture of the sunroom before
0 Likes   February 13, 2013 at 11:27AM
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Louis Pardoe
To remove the old adhesive off the surface, use ' Back- Set ' its made for removing cement but works great on almost everything and is safe.. here is a youtube link
0 Likes   February 13, 2013 at 11:50AM
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Terri Symington, ASID
You room is coming along nicely! If you wrap the beam in a rough cedar, that would add a rustic element and nice contrast to the cabinets painted or white washed. You will want to keep the flooring all the same through out the open areas. What is your sub floor? Concrete or pier and beam? An inexpensive flooring is to use pine boards that have been given a greyed wash. You don't want to use a high grade of pine to get the character you will want. Some people will claim that pine is too soft... but don't listen to them. If you do this, you will have to be careful in how you do the cabinets so that there are not too many "washed" elements withing the space.
0 Likes   February 13, 2013 at 11:50AM
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intoit
Terri, those pictures are adorable. Of course it is fine to have a designer kitchen and home. I just got the idea from the bedrooms that he was going for something different. Did not mean to offend you at all. I live in a much wetter climate than Texas so we have many more mud issues on our farms.
0 Likes   February 13, 2013 at 12:03PM
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Stone & Land, LLC
intoit, this is a no offense zone, as long as ideas are being exchanged everything is cool with me. Terri is a pro, and I don't see anything in your comments or anyone elses that would be offensive. I don't mind a difference of opinion. While I may not agree with Terri when she said that "Your idea of country is very out dated" I didn't take offense and niether should anyone else. I don't agree to paint all the trim white, but Terri won't sulk over it. I do appreciate her other ideas and opinion and the time she's taken to comment. Same goes for the cork, I don't think it'll work with dogs and mud but at least it was a good idea. Maybe I can use it in the basement to soften the concrete, turn it into more informal family space.
1 Like   February 13, 2013 at 3:50PM
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Stone & Land, LLC
jacqui87, do you have any specific things you'd do with the spaces, or the flooring. You said you have a dog and kids. What would be better? Maybe an image would be nice. Please try not to be snarky, it'll kill the exchange.
0 Likes   February 14, 2013 at 7:27AM
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Cancork Floor Inc.
Thanks Olldroo for the suggestion of Cancork...lovely!

Ok, so I've been invited to the table with my "info". A cork glue down will take a TREMENDOUS amount of prep/new underlay (read 1/4" plywood laid over old subfloor/gluey mess).

There is another way...floating flooring. As long as you get most of the goop off, you can go ahead and float a cork floor (I would go ahead and use cork underlay as an "isolating membrane" between floor and substrate = cheap+more cork for sound/temp control).

If you are in Canada = www.corkfloorsales.com for our 40+ floor selections
USA = www.icorkfloor.com for 35+ options

If you need the flooring to go into bathrooms, simply go with a glue down tile. Easy fix for floor heights = cement backer board in bathroom (1/4" + 1/8" cork tile) = matching floor heights.

We carry flooring ranging from $2.29/sf - $4.09/sf...but most of our floating flooring is in the $3.49 - $3.79/sf range.

Have fun...focus on $$$ ticket items first...get those out of the way/budget and then see what is left in the kitty.
0 Likes   February 14, 2013 at 8:15AM
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Stone & Land, LLC
Was tired today, didn't get much done, couldn't stand being on hands and knees again, just some cleaning and putting clutter into the hen house that was in the cabinets in the laundry room and back porch. Luckily the stick on tiles came up very easily with a putty knife. Finished demolishing that area. The laundry room had about a 50 year old clothes drier. That'll be scrapped by an aquaintance. The laundry will be taken over by the master bath, laundry will be moved to the unfinished ( utility ) area of the basement. This white door will the glass panes be removed and entry opened up when we get the doors and window in here replaced ( probably like early April ) All of the cabinet are out now but here are some progress pictures, if you consider this progress.
0 Likes   February 14, 2013 at 3:57PM
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Mary Poulos Interior and Exterior Design
I apologize for repeating if this has already been said, but to me the only answer that will really work is wood floors in the hallway to enhance the wood door trims. The flooring should be a little darker than the door trims. Then a muted neutral for the walls.
0 Likes   February 14, 2013 at 4:19PM
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Mary Poulos Interior and Exterior Design
Try not to put pictures on the very narrow portions of the hallway, but, perhaps gather them together in neat statements.
1 Like   February 14, 2013 at 4:20PM
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olldroo
Keep that white door for some creative artwork.
1 Like   February 14, 2013 at 5:11PM
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Stone & Land, LLC
Good ideas olldroo. Yes Mary Poulos I agree about pictures. Have to think about wood floors. I love them in the bedrooms but kind of want all this area, back porch, hallway, kitchen, sunroom (which might turn into one big "country kithchen") the same material and it has to be hard working for the high traffic, kids, dog, snow, mud.
0 Likes   February 14, 2013 at 6:52PM
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olldroo
1 Like   February 14, 2013 at 9:36PM
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Stone & Land, LLC
I was thinking about wood flooring and saw an ad (lumber liquidators) for Morningstar Natural Strand Bamboo (5/8" x 3-3/4"). It says its really durable, most reviews love it. The only negative comments were that it was hard to install because you need a powerful nailgun, need to predrill when face nailing and it wears out bits and blades. The other comment was difficult to clean (wipe up water right away or else). I wonder if thats because its unfinished? Would this be wierd with the other hardwood and trim in the house? They have other products that are pre finished as well but matching stain color won't be exact. Here was an image by a customer. Funny, it looked almost exactly like the dimensions of the existing kitchen. I like the light color, but then I'd probably have to paint the trim, which I'm still not crazy about. I suppose it would really only affect the look in the hallway. Does anyone have experience with this product?
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 6:16AM
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Terri Symington, ASID
Bamboo can be a great product to use in the right application. It is very contemporary and I don't think that it would "marry" well with your hardwood floors...it will look like a remodeling addition that one day the next people to own the house will ask..."what were they thinking when they put that in...?"

One of the cons on bamboo is that it produces a higher pitch sound when walking on it as opposed to the deep. solid sound of walking on hard wood.
1 Like   February 21, 2013 at 9:04AM
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Cancork Floor Inc.
Please be careful with bamboo. LL has a history of "changing" suppliers but NOT changing the name on their cartson. "Morning Star" might have had 3 different companies produce the "same" floor over several years. I'm hearing that "Morning Star" has high levels of formaldehyde because they use urea formaldehyde as their binder instead of the phenol-formaldehyde which is more stable...but more expensive.

Apparently the smell takes months (read 6-8 mos.) to dissipate and it gets WORSE before it gets better. People have ended up moving out of their homes because of headaches, nose bleeds, eyes swelling shut, conjunctivitis, sinus infections, and strong allergic reactions.

If you have any chemical sensitivities, please look at another floor or, if you must have bamboo, a different brand.

People have been complaining of a horrible smell with bamboo because of the urea formaldehyde. Class action suites are occurring all over the USA against USFloors and some are suggesting LL will be the "next one up"!

Please look up the "Morning Star" msds (material safety data sheet). This document shows the "ingredients" list for the material and the dangers that come with it.

LL will tell you, "We've never had any complaints." Which is not true. There are multiple complaints against LL and "Morning Star".
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 9:43AM
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jacqui87
Vinyl tile would be waterproof/forgiving material. Going with a commercial grade has that 50's school feel, but changing the color and pattern will maintain the era but giving it a new life. Your client sounds set on having dogs. This is my big dog, she eats wood flooring, tears carpet, and would love a chance to dig at cork, vinyl tile would be cheaper to replace a few tiles here and there.
1 Like   February 21, 2013 at 6:08PM
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jacqui87
This would also go with the existing woodwork, in my opinion.
2 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 6:17PM
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CMR Interiors & Design Consultations Inc.
Duchateau floors are the best for busy households. Their vinyl plank is AMAZING looking. Looks so real and sounds nice too. I put heathy choice sub floor under it too. Check it out here: http://duchateaufloors.com/collections/vinyl-deluxe/
1 Like   February 21, 2013 at 6:20PM
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Jayme H.
I like it..it is cool, and could work with a retro style.
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 6:24PM
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nanalovesdesign
CMR Interiors, If you don't mind answering my question, I am looking at a Duchateau Floor for my kitchen, great room. I have not done remodeling for 25 years and I am overwhelmed by the options, but enjoying it nonetheless. I have narrowed my floors down to two DuChateau wood floors, one is the Riverston collection, Danube and the other is The Chateau Collection St. Moritz. Have you had experience with these? I am covering over 1500 sq. ft so I am very concerned about making the "right Choice" as it is a big investment. Approx. a 30 X 35 combo kitchen and great room. Any input you can give me would be greatly appreciated.
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 6:50PM
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CMR Interiors & Design Consultations Inc.
I'm using a vinyl of theirs for a clients work out room--I have not used any of their engineered or wood products yet but I have seen them in person and think they are fabulous to look at. I will look these up.

What color cabinets are in your kitchen?
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 7:31PM
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CMR Interiors & Design Consultations Inc.
Okay love the Danube. Stunning and reminds me of southern chestnut. Like the Chateau but it may not do well in resale. I think the Danube is the safer choice. If your house is more modern and a bit edgy then do the Chateau.....esp if its minimal as well. But of course, you cabinet color dictates the floor and if you do the floors first, the floor must be complimented by the cabinetry. I would love a slightly warm white with either, or a gray painted cabinet with the danube.
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 7:34PM
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nanalovesdesign
CMR, I meant to tell you I was leaning toward Danube, so your input really helped me solidify my decision. They look different that in the website photograph.
Here are the samples I have, Danube on the left, St. Moritz on the right
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 7:49PM
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Pateridis Properties
Be careful because the old tile probably contains asbestos... see this link to recognize it, http://inspectapedia.com/sickhouse/asbestoslookB.htm
2 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 8:37PM
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bclowg
Pateridis Properties, exactly what I was going to say too!

Both the linoleum and the lino tile could have asbestos. The paper backing on the rolled out linoleum is what you have to worry about, you can actually see the asbestos fibers embedded in the paper. Used for "fire proofing". In the floor tiles, it's the adhesive that contains the asbestos.

In our house, built in the 1970s, we stopped short of ripping up the linoleum kitchen floor, and opted instead to raise the subfloor by 3/4" to match the kitchen floor. We nailed and glued OSB plywood to the floor. Yes, we had to saw the bottoms off a few doors, and we used a thinner 3/8" strand woven bamboo floor instead of the standard 3/4" floor. But it was worth not putting my family, or workers hired on our loooowww budget, at risk.
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 9:41PM
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mseamm
In regards to the comments about LL Morning Star floors containing urea formaldehyde that is not the case currently. The October 2013 MSDS shows phenol formaldehyde resin is now used. I'm hoping that is accurate as we just installed carbonized strand bamboo in our home.
0 Likes   January 19, 2014 at 6:25PM
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