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christopher luther
February 15, 2013 in Design Dilemma
After I strip off the dreaded popcorn. What ideas/thoughts/suggestions would you may have on what or should I paint the angled drywall portions. Then the same question about the ceiling.
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Eagledzines
Can you post a picture of the room itself?
February 15, 2013 at 4:44PM   
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christopher luther
Yeah - here is a pict of the room
February 15, 2013 at 4:51PM   
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Eagledzines
I would paint both the ceiling and the hip white or at least a very light shade of the wall below. Here is a picture that shows a tray hip--similar.
It has a nice crown around the perimeter. Rope lighting could be placed in the crown to lighten up the ceiling. The structure certainly has a presence in the room.
I'm assuming it goes all the way around the room. Is that correct?

February 15, 2013 at 5:10PM     
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Keitha
Love the addition of moulding! Gives such presence to an ordinary white ceiling.
February 15, 2013 at 5:16PM   
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christopher luther
Part 1::.
No the hip does not go all the way around. Crazy! This pict is looking the other way - "backside" of my bedroom as you may say.
February 15, 2013 at 5:25PM   
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christopher luther
Part 2 ::.
Thank-you for replying! I have a color scheme in mind, the img. below. I think adding a crown around the perimeter is a great idea. Could you please explain "rope wiring" to me?
February 15, 2013 at 5:28PM   
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christopher luther
I do think your are very right about the 'hip' & ceiling being a lighter color than the walls.
Thnx again,
-cl
February 15, 2013 at 5:31PM   
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Carolyn Albert-Kincl, ASID
If you are planning on painting the walls a light to medium color, I would definitely continue the paint up to include the slopes and the entire ceiling so that the room is all one color except for the trim which typically would be white. It will give you a lovely cocoon feel with no questions about whether you should have stopped the paint here or there.

I do this with almost every house I work on and it creates a wonderfully pleasant interior space.
Carolyn Albert-Kincl, ASID
February 15, 2013 at 5:32PM   
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Tres McKinney Design
From the second picture you posted it does not look like you can add crown moulding all around the perimeter of the room. If that is the case then I recommend you have the walls and ceiling all mudded out in a smooth finish and both walls and ceiling all painted the same color.
February 15, 2013 at 5:33PM   
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christopher luther
As a graphic designer I have the urge/feeling to mix it up. I do think you are correct in keeping the walls, sloping hip & ceiling the same color or slightly diffrent hue/shade of said color.
February 15, 2013 at 5:36PM   
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CMR Interiors & Design Consultations Inc.
I saw on DIY that they come in and spray vinegar and water on the popcorn and scrape it off--it comes right off. But don't try on your own. It's messy to remove!
February 15, 2013 at 5:45PM   
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christopher luther
Now that IS a very interesting idea/thought rope lighting. Oh my!
February 15, 2013 at 5:50PM   
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Susanna
Isn't it true that some popcorn ceilings have asbestos? Is there a way to test this before the homeowner starts the removal process? What year was your house built?
February 15, 2013 at 5:54PM   
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christopher luther
February 15, 2013 at 6:00PM   
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michael amendolara
Some older ceiling do contain asbestos. Sheetrock it and forget it.
February 15, 2013 at 6:04PM   
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Eagledzines
If you're not used to crown you might find it a challenge to cut it on the angle you posted in the second picture. You might find it easier if you have a profile tool


to measure the degree of the angle. Use 1/2 of the degree (if it's a 30 deg angle, cut each piece at 15 deg to total 30 deg) and then make a mock up of some short pieces till you get the angle exact on the combination saw.
February 15, 2013 at 6:05PM   
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Eagledzines
Since the hip doesn't go all the way around the room, the rope lighting wouldn't work.
February 15, 2013 at 6:09PM   
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christopher luther
I agree no rope lights but interesting idea. Thank-you for the info on the profile tool. Do you agree with the above post about sheet-rocking over the popcorn hips?
February 15, 2013 at 6:13PM   
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tamlynn126
I would paint it the same color as your walls, I have mine painted the same as the walls and it makes the room look bigger.
February 15, 2013 at 6:14PM   
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Jay Van Daley
I detest coffered ceilings. They always seem to crack in the hipped corners. I used lightweight metal studs to transform a ceiling similar to this into a stepped ceiling. If you are leaving the slopes as is, I would definitely go monochromatic with walls and ceiling. Here's a picture of what I did with my ceiling, just to clarify
February 15, 2013 at 6:28PM   
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Jay Van Daley
another angle.
February 15, 2013 at 6:30PM   
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Susanna
Just trying to look out for you as my aunt died of asbestos cancer a few years after they disturbed a popcorn ceiling to install a skylight. Glad you know the origin, age and safety.

It's one of those things a lot of people don't realize is a possibility until you lose someone. Once you do it is impossible not to speak up. Sorry to interrupt your thread.
February 15, 2013 at 6:36PM   
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Jay Van Daley
If you know there is no asbestos, removing popcorn ceilings isn't that difficult. A pump sprayer, a fine mist of water, and a mud knife will remove about 90%. Some elbow grease and the same scraper should take care of the rest. Once it is wetted down, it usually peels off fairly quickly. It is very messy to remove, but once you re-texture, you will be very glad you did.
February 15, 2013 at 6:40PM   
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Eagledzines
Adding asbestos was banned in CA in the 1970s but other states continued to use it. If you live in CA and the house was built in the 80s it probably doesn't have asbestos. That being said, it's nothing to fool around with. Even small amounts can cause devastating health effects when it is disturbed. If you don't want to sheetrock over it, call an asbestos remediation expert in your area. I have heard that the tests don't cost more than $150 and you get the results in a day.
February 15, 2013 at 6:44PM   
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