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Renovation dilemma : re-carpet OR timber floors?
ritevibe
February 19, 2013 in Design Dilemma
Here's the deal ... i own my home, and it needs some updating like painting, and freshening up. My issue is, I don't know if I'll stay here for a long while or rent it out and buy another place to live in. So would you suggest I put timber floorboards down, even if in 18 moths I might rent it out, or should I just re-carpet. I'm afraid renters might not look after my timber floors etc? Thanks for your ideas and suggestions!
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PRO
PT. Wisanka
How about you use flooring or decking, when you move from your rent home you also can move your flooring or decking.
1 Like   February 20, 2013 at 12:11AM
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rinqreation
Is it a house or an appartment? (considering sound and neighbours)
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 12:51AM
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ritevibe
By the way , It is a house so I don't have to consider noise issues, thanks.
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 1:52AM
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kitasei
I think you will be surprised at how reasonably priced wood flooring is (I was). Many landlords require tenants to cover a certain percentage of a floor with rugs, so no reason you couldn't. I'm sure you will find more tenants who find a wood floor more appealing than used carpeting.
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 1:57AM
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csmalara
had the same dilemma 3 yrs ago, was leaning toward carpet but husband was pushing for wood floors. Carpeting would've cost about $4,000, the wood cost was $6,000. Went with the wood and have been very happy with that decision. Much easier to keep clean. Renters will be less likely to ruin the floors then the carpeting which will show dirt and wear in the walk pattern. Wood floors are timeless.
I also recarpeted the master bedroom at the same time with a very good quality carpet that cost the same per square foot as the wood floors and I wish that I would've used the wood in there too.
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 2:58AM
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PRO
Dytecture
Wood flooring would be able to take up the 'abuse' if future renters don't take care of it. Otherwise you might need to replace the carpets every time you change renters.
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 7:00AM
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What's Inside Design Ltd.
I'm going to get a lot of flack for this as it's not the "popular" choice, but it is a very practical one!

When renovating to rent, you want your floors to look amazing, but also want them to be extremely durable!

In your situation, I'd recommend vinyl plank flooring.
Vinyl flooring has come a long way and looks so good many people cannot tell the difference between it and the real thing!

Major benefit (if you choose a good quality vinyl) is that it's almost indestructible!!!!
Your floors would look amazing and you wouldn't have to worry about renters scratching them when they move in and out!
Renter after renter, they would still look brand new! (and clean)

Look into it, do your research and decide for yourself.
But I can tell you....all my clients who've installed it have been extremely happy!!!

Caroline :)
3 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 7:25AM
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PRO
What's Inside Design Ltd.
Here's a picture of a hall like yours done in sheet vinyl. (Plank vinyl looks even more realistic)

2 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 7:30AM
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PRO
MARLENE BURNS FINE ART
if you are worried about renters not taking care of floors, have someone come in to maintain them once a year or as needed....
what they could do to carpeting, is far worse!
2 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 7:31AM
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michigammemom
I am a landlord and I would agree with What's Inside Design that a luxury vinyl plank floor would be the most practical choice for a rental property. It's almost impossible to insure compliance when it comes to tenants removing shoes, adding protective pads to furniture legs, or cleaning sand/grit that can damage hardwood and once a year maintenance on hardwood would be cost prohibitive.
3 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 7:40AM
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What's Inside Design Ltd.
1 Like   February 20, 2013 at 7:42AM
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ritevibe
Thanks guys for your feedback...much appreciated! Also I'm wondering what u think of timber all through out including in the kitchen area (replacing the tiles) -- i think it would look seamless and great, but I'm concerned about water spills and the extra wear & tear in traffic kitchen area... Maybe laying down a new tile might be a better option, perhaps like a travertine, or a large Italian off white colour ceramic tile? What are your thoughts people? Thanks again :-)
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 5:01PM
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ritevibe
here are some more pics for u to see :-) However what was just a "freshen up paint job"...has now morphed into re-doing the whole floor as I'm tired of the terracotta tile look, AND i now have a sneaking suspicion, my bench tops and kitchen cabinets might just need a fresh revamp as well -- OMG how did this all just happen? Kinda funny hey ... Has this happened you you guys as well??
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 5:16PM
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koehlej
Isn't Travertine pretty porous and needs some upkeep? Also, I wouldn't suggest very light colored floors as you see every bit of dirt on it.
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 5:31PM
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judianna20
Vinyl, which is put down in strips, looks like real wood and should you ever come back to this house, you put hardwood right on top.
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 5:34PM
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rockyrocky7
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 5:46PM
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kitasei
terra cotta tile is timeless. Don't change it if it's not cracked!
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 6:24PM
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ritevibe
Hey guys..again many thanks for all your comments... I love the vinyl tiles idea, and if it isnt broken don't fix it option - mmm I love it! Very sensible thanks, now I just need to decide.
1 Like   February 22, 2013 at 6:58AM
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ritevibe
Hi again... After months of procrastinating, I'm now ready to start my freshen up yay :-) So I'm wondering if anyone has any comments or ideas or suggestions about Great quality and Good looking laminate flooring options and brands. I have heard the German made products are very good?
Any feedback appreciated! ... Much thanks!!
0 Likes   September 5, 2013 at 3:30PM
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Nancy Travisinteriors
If you can afford wood, that is way to go.
0 Likes   September 5, 2013 at 5:07PM
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ritevibe
Thanks travis... I totally love real wood, but I have not examined the laminate option. I hear they kinda look and perform well?
If anyone has any info on good quality (perhaps commercial grade) laminate to use, I'd sure appreciate it.. thanks :)
0 Likes   September 6, 2013 at 3:25PM
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Elisa Jed
I would definitely suggest wood flooring, especially if you want to rent out eventually. Carpet is too hard to keep clean with renters. However, if you decide on a cheaper carpet you can get away with just replacing it every now and then. My sister used this place: www.kamloopscarpetwarehouse.ca to do her carpets and said they had some good prices. It just depends on the type of investment you want to put into it.
0 Likes   September 17, 2013 at 8:09AM
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maryellen_perone
I agree with a previous comment regarding laminate plank flooring, it doesn't have as much upkeep and will be able to withstand a little more abuse. You would be surprised at how beautiful some of the products are. Regarding cost, just do your homework, because some vinyl products can be even more expensive then some hardwood flooring, so make sure you are making an informed decision. Just one more comment, I think the hallway is a little too narrow to accommodate the table that you have in your picture, I think it constricts the space and you need to walk around it, if the hallways is a standard 3 feet then the table probably projects at least 15-18". Just curious if anyone has bumped into it?
0 Likes   March 9, 2014 at 5:53AM
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PRO
Earp Bros - Innovative Tile Solutions
Hi ritevibe,

It seems that many of your worries are to do with the ongoing maintenance and wear that will inevitably come from renting your property out. Timber would quite obviously look amazing in your space, though the damage and maintenance could be restrictive. Have you investigated timber look 'parquet' tiles? Being porcelain, you are not going to find anything more durable and long lasting.

It is definitely worth a look at what's available in this material, I will attach some images for your reference and a link to give you a starting point. (
)

In such an environment, I think cost effectiveness would probably be better understood over the life of the floor, as vinyls and floorboards are going to require significant amounts of maintenance, are going to cop a bit of a beating and are not going to last as long as tile.

If you want more info I am happy to help out,

Best of luck!
0 Likes   September 11, 2014 at 5:41PM
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