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Pation privacy wood screen - what wood to use?
kesler_f
February 21, 2013 in Design Dilemma
Another question for the expert builder here.
I'm a homeowner/ architect and DIY. So i want to build a wooden privacy screen to serve as a backdrop to my patio. But I’m having trouble finding information of what wood is best for this exterior application. Or is it a matter of water sealing the any wood.
The picture I found here is the basic idea.....wood planks of different stains supported on wood vert. columns. Any info on the wood and tips for doing so?

Thanks!
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Terri Symington, ASID
A current project I am working on required me to design a fence for the landscaping which is a combination of an 6' privacy with an 18" 2x2 picket on top. The contractor building the fence recommended a combination of materials...for the pickets he said we should use a cedar because it will not warp or twist like the treated pine. You may have a similar situation with your battens. To save on cost he is cutting the pickets himself from 2x12 boards.
February 21, 2013 at 3:08pm   
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Creations Nadia Interior Design
Cedar is the best, you can stain with oil based Sikkens product - has very good shades and very durable:))
February 21, 2013 at 5:19pm   
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Revolutionary Gardens
cedar or redwood. If you use basic pressure treated pine you'll get some pretty spectacular twisting and warping on a fence of that design.
February 21, 2013 at 6:33pm   
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Duxborough Designs
I have had good results using PT SYP with Cabots Australian Timber Oil. Everyone thinks it's teak and does not warp out or crack too much if you keep up the finish. Try to get the oil based ATO - may be discontinued and water based is not the same.
February 21, 2013 at 6:52pm   
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printesa
How about redwood or ipe?
February 21, 2013 at 6:58pm   
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kesler_f
It seems the trend is using oil. What exactly does the oil do? seal the wood is my guess. but does it waterproof the wood, or does it not matter to waterproof?? Anyone? Thanks for the quick replies.
February 21, 2013 at 7:00pm   
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Duxborough Designs
Redwood or cedar are great and will take a finish well, but expensive. Ipe, very very expensive, and so hard it will not take any finish, you have to let it go grey. But it will last forever. My Ipe deck is 15 yrs. old and looks great. There are some finishes made for Ipe but they don't work, ive tried.

The oil finish seals the wood against most water intrusion, which is all you want. a hard impenetrable finish like varnish will crack and flake and can't be repaired once water gets under it. Oil finishes repel most water, which is what wood wants, and won't crack or peel, it just wears out. Most soft woods will get gnarly without a finish.
February 21, 2013 at 7:14pm   
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Aja Mazin
Cypress.
February 21, 2013 at 7:40pm   
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printesa
You could also use cedar, stain it and then, if you don't want to have to care for it, use epoxy..it is glossy, but you won't have to do a thing after that.
February 22, 2013 at 5:55am   
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kesler_f
Would the choose of wood say stated already still work if not flat planks? How about retangular hort. strips of wood ( 1 1/2" x 3/4")? I'm thinking of up-light to get the light effects. Something like the render.
same application applies?

thanks!
February 22, 2013 at 8:26am   
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ASVInteriors
All these are great ideas. I have been advised to use Ipe in an environment with cold and hot temperatures because they tend to swell or crack less (and no splinters). In fairness we don't use cedar or redwood in Europe. If you stain or treat it, it, it is to colour it and protect that colour. What is nice is to leave the wood natural and let it go silver. But again, if you are in termite land - not sure what your options are.
BTW love this idea - very classy.
February 22, 2013 at 8:33am   
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lewis + smith
Clear cedar is preferred. Tightknot cedar is a cost saving alternative. It depends where you live. In Washington we have mostly western red cedar, redwood is more common down in California. For decks we prefer ipe. Ipe is more expensive and more difficult to work, but will last longer. It does twist more than most wood if not adequatley fastend. Ipe will take an oil finish but needs to be refinished every year to maintain that look as the oil evaporates out of the ipe faster than cedar. The oil finish is a nicer look than a finish such as Sikkens. The Sikkens finish is more durable but has a more plastic aesthetic. An oil finish like Penofin is our preferred finish-wear a respirator. Hope that helps.
February 22, 2013 at 8:41am   
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kesler_f
Thank you! Since you bring up the climate factor. I forgot to mention, I'm in NY so we get cold and hot weather here. Protecting i'm guessing is where the sealing it with oil helps? Woods mentioned above still apply?
February 22, 2013 at 8:42am   
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Duxborough Designs
Beware, Penofin really stinks - for a long time! For Ipe I use Mesmer's UV Plus, made especially for Ipe, I re-apply every year, but after even 4 months it looks worn out and done. Let it go grey!
February 22, 2013 at 8:45am   
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ASVInteriors
Thanks Duxborough you have said what I wanted to say, treating it is to keep the colour brown rather than grey... and it does require annual treatment... (I speak on behalf of ipe being unversed in the other woods)
February 22, 2013 at 8:51am   
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